India limits visitors to save Taj Mahal

Daily visitors to the Taj Mahal average 10,000-15,000 but can be much higher on weekends, going up to around 70,000. Nearly 6.5 million visited the monument in 2016, according to government figures. (AFP)
Updated 03 January 2018
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India limits visitors to save Taj Mahal

AGRA, India: India is to restrict the number of daily visitors to the Taj Mahal in an attempt to preserve the iconic 17th-century monument to love, its biggest tourist attraction.
Millions of mostly Indian tourists visit the Taj Mahal every year and their numbers are increasing steadily as domestic travel becomes easier.
Experts say the vast crowds increase wear and tear on the white marble tomb, which already must undergo regular cleaning to stop it turning yellow from polluted air, and could put pressure on its foundations.
In future only 40,000 local tourists will be allowed to enter the historic complex per day, authorities said Wednesday.
“We have to ensure the safety of the monument and visitors as well. Crowd management was emerging as a big challenge for us,” an official with the Archaeological Survey of India — which controls the monument — said on condition of anonymity.
The restrictions will not apply to foreigners, who pay 1,000 rupees ($16) to enter.
Indian visitors normally pay just 40 rupees, but will be able to buy the more expensive ticket if they want to get around the limit.
The Taj Mahal was built by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan as a tomb for his beloved wife Mumtaz Mahal, who died giving birth in 1631.
Anyone wanting to see the main crypt, which houses the couple’s spectacular marble graves inlaid with semi-precious stones, will also have to pay for the pricier ticket.
The graves also date back to the 17th century but do not actually contain the bodies of the royal couple, who are buried under a separate lower chamber.
Visitors to the UNESCO World Heritage site already have to contend with lengthy queues and heavy security.
The plan to restrict visitors comes after five people were injured in a crush on the last day of the year, which often attracts large crowds.
“It’s a welcome move because the last time we came here it was very chaotic,” Seema Sarkar, a tourist from the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, said.
Local tourist police inspector R.B. Pandey said it was a much-needed step.
“It’s priceless heritage and if we don’t cap the tourist numbers it will be lost for future generations,” he said.
“You just cannot control such huge crowds.”
Daily visitors to the Taj Mahal average 10,000-15,000 but can be much higher at weekends, going up to around 70,000.
Nearly 6.5 million visited the monument in 2016, according to government figures.
The Taj Mahal has attracted world leaders and royalty, including former US President Bill Clinton.
Diana, the late British princess, was famously photographed alone on a marble seat there in 1992.
But the mausoleum faces an array of threats, including the yellowing effects of smog.
In 2016, green stains on its rear wall were blamed on excrement from insects.
Authorities have in the past covered the iconic monument’s facade with “mud packs” made of fuller’s earth, which draws out the impurities, to restore its whiteness.


Jeddah Summer festival begins on June 25

The event has succeeded in establishing Jeddah as an international tourist destination with its tourism boom and high annual hotel occupancy rate. (SPA)
Updated 11 June 2018
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Jeddah Summer festival begins on June 25

  • During the festival, people will compete for 500 prizes worth SR1 million and draws on various other prizes
  • The festival gives investors in the tourism sector a variety of options to expand their investments to include shopping and entertainment sectors

JEDDAH: The 20th Jeddah Summer festival kicks off on June 25, offering 50 cultural and entertainment activities, including theater performances, folk art, maritime shows, shopping activities, poetry evenings, and sports events.
The 30-day festival is organized by the Jeddah Chamber of Commerce and Industry (JCCI) with the participation of 10 big shopping centers.
During the festival, people will compete for 500 prizes worth SR1 million and draws on various other prizes.
JCCI Secretary-General Hassan bin Ibrahim Dahlan said that the Jeddah Summer festival was one of the most important festivals in the region.
He pointed out that the JCCI, with its experience in managing festivals and events, has benefited from international experiences for investing in a Saudi tourism product.
“This year, we have focused on attracting visitors and families from inside and outside the Kingdom through a series of activities that satisfy all tastes at the Jeddah Corniche, at shopping malls, and across Jeddah,” he added.
Dahlan explained that the festival’s organizers were keen to capture the cultural and civilizational aspects of the Makkah region in general and Jeddah in particular in order to make a qualitative leap in domestic tourism and achieve the objectives of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030.
He explained that some of the activities were to be held for the first time during the 20th Jeddah Summer festival this year with the support from the Jeddah Municipality, the General Entertainment Authority, and the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage.
“The JCCI was assigned the great responsibility of choosing various quality activities that meet international standards,” he said.
“The festival gives investors in the tourism sector a variety of options to expand their investments to include shopping and entertainment sectors, especially in light of the increased number of visitors to Jeddah throughout the year.
“The event has succeeded in establishing Jeddah as an international tourist destination with its tourism boom and high annual hotel occupancy rate, owing to the developed and innovative Saudi tourism products provided,” he continued.
Dahlan pointed out that for the first time, this year’s festival will host a friendly basketball tournament for people with special needs, broadcast the FIFA World Cup games, feature an air village, and hold cultural activities related to women driving cars such as “Hayya Nasouq” (Let’s Drive).
Dahlan also emphasized the importance of the festival’s partnership with the Ministry of Commerce and Investment and the promotional programs and contests it offers.