Documentary on Rose McGowan coming to E!

Rose McGowan
Updated 03 January 2018
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Documentary on Rose McGowan coming to E!

NEW YORK: Actress and activist Rose McGowan will be the subject of a new documentary TV series.
E! said Tuesday it will air the first part of “Citizen Rose” on Jan. 30, which coincides with the release of her memoir, “Brave.” Four more episodes will air in the spring.
McGowan helped open a national public discussion about sexual harassment and abuse when she accused Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein of raping her. Weinstein has repeatedly denied “allegations of non-consensual sex.”
With the documentary, McGowan said she hopes to “amplify my message of bravery, art, joy and survival” and to “show how we can heal through art even when being hounded by evil.”
She will serve as an executive producer.
When The New York Times revealed in October 2017 that she was part of a settlement involving Weinstein in an alleged sexual harassment case, McGowan declined to comment. “Women fight on,” she wrote afterward. “And to the men out there, stand up. We need you as allies.” According to the Times, Weinstein has reached at least eight settlements with women, including McGowan, who reached a $100,000 settlement with him after an encounter in a hotel room with the executive producer in 1997 during the Sundance Film Festival.
On Oct. 12, 2017, McGowan alleged that Weinstein had raped her and that Amazon Studios dropped her project after she complained. On the same day, McGowan said that Twitter suspended her account for 12 hours after she repeatedly tweeted about Weinstein’s alleged sexual misconduct, including toward her. Twitter explained that McGowan’s account had violated its privacy policy because one of her tweets included a private phone number.


Antarctic researchers mark winter solstice with icy plunge

Updated 21 June 2018
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Antarctic researchers mark winter solstice with icy plunge

SYDNEY: Scientists based in Antarctica welcomed the winter solstice by plunging into icy waters Thursday as part of a “mad tradition” heralding the return of brighter days after weeks of darkness.
In temperatures of -22 degrees Celsius (-7.6 degrees Fahrenheit), staff at Australia’s Casey research station marked midwinter’s day by cutting a small pool in the thick ice before stripping off and jumping in.
Casey station leader Rebecca Jeffcoat said midwinter day — the shortest of the year — was the most anticipated occasion on the Antarctic calendar and has been celebrated from the time of the early explorers.
“Swimming in Antarctica’s below freezing waters is something of a mad tradition, but our hardy expeditioners look forward to it, with 21 of the 26 people on station brave enough to take an icy dip this year,” she said.
“Midwinter day is really important in Antarctica because it marks the halfway point of our year here on the ice and it means the sun will spend slightly longer in the sky each day.”
Celebrations took place at all three of Australia’s Antarctic research stations and its sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island base, with feasting, an exchange of handmade gifts, and messages from home read out.
Jeffcoat, who is experiencing her first Antarctic winter, said the continent was extraordinary.
“The environment is spectacular and harsh, and we experience the most incredible range of conditions, from below freezing blizzards to auroras, or the midwinter twilight as the sun skims the horizon,” she said.
“It is challenging being so far from family and friends, but we have built a really close-knit community of friends on station that we’ll likely have for the rest of our lives as we’ve shared this great experience together.”
Australia currently has 75 researchers living and working on the frozen continent as part of the Australian Antarctic Program, with most of them on 12-month postings.