Documentary on Rose McGowan coming to E!

Rose McGowan
Updated 03 January 2018
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Documentary on Rose McGowan coming to E!

NEW YORK: Actress and activist Rose McGowan will be the subject of a new documentary TV series.
E! said Tuesday it will air the first part of “Citizen Rose” on Jan. 30, which coincides with the release of her memoir, “Brave.” Four more episodes will air in the spring.
McGowan helped open a national public discussion about sexual harassment and abuse when she accused Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein of raping her. Weinstein has repeatedly denied “allegations of non-consensual sex.”
With the documentary, McGowan said she hopes to “amplify my message of bravery, art, joy and survival” and to “show how we can heal through art even when being hounded by evil.”
She will serve as an executive producer.
When The New York Times revealed in October 2017 that she was part of a settlement involving Weinstein in an alleged sexual harassment case, McGowan declined to comment. “Women fight on,” she wrote afterward. “And to the men out there, stand up. We need you as allies.” According to the Times, Weinstein has reached at least eight settlements with women, including McGowan, who reached a $100,000 settlement with him after an encounter in a hotel room with the executive producer in 1997 during the Sundance Film Festival.
On Oct. 12, 2017, McGowan alleged that Weinstein had raped her and that Amazon Studios dropped her project after she complained. On the same day, McGowan said that Twitter suspended her account for 12 hours after she repeatedly tweeted about Weinstein’s alleged sexual misconduct, including toward her. Twitter explained that McGowan’s account had violated its privacy policy because one of her tweets included a private phone number.


Armored dinosaur with spiky head unveiled at Utah museum

This undated photo from the Natural History Museum of Utah shows the heavily ornamented skull of an ankylosaur, a squat plant-eater that was covered in bony armor from its spiky head to its clubbed tail, before its unveiling at the museum in Salt Lake City. (AP)
Updated 21 July 2018
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Armored dinosaur with spiky head unveiled at Utah museum

  • Paleontologists believe the animals migrated to North America several times over the eons when lowered sea levels allowed them to cross a land bridge
  • The fossil was discovered on the Kaiparowits Formation, a thick layer of sandstone that also has vast coal reserves inside a sprawling national monument

SALT LAKE CITY: A dinosaur that was covered in bony armor from its spiky head to its clubbed tail has been unveiled at a museum in Utah.
The species of ankylosaur was a squat plant-eater that roamed southern Utah on four legs about 76 million years ago, during the late Cretaceous Period. At that time, the desert state was hot and humid, covered with slow-moving streams and rivers as well as large conifer trees, paleontologist Randall Irmis said.
It was about as long as a large alligator and stood at a height that would have been about waist-high for a tall human. It likely used its distinctive clubbed tail and armor for protection, though they could also have been used for display.
The fossil unveiled Thursday at the Natural History Museum of Utah was first discovered in 2008 in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, a rich dinosaur repository in southern Utah.
The fossil was discovered on the Kaiparowits Formation, a thick layer of sandstone that also has vast coal reserves inside a sprawling national monument that was one of two President Donald Trump ordered downsized last year. The spot where the fossil was found remains within Grand Staircase-Escalante boundaries, though areas that are now outside the boundaries also have fossil potential, Irmis said.
Researchers were expecting it to have smooth bony armor on its skull like other North American ankylosaurs, but were surprised to find evidence that it instead had spiky armor on its head and snout, similar to fossils found in Asia.
Paleontologists believe the animals migrated to North America several times over the eons when lowered sea levels allowed them to cross a land bridge.
The species was dubbed Akainacephalus johnsoni to recognize Randy Johnson, a retired chemist and museum volunteer who spent hundreds of hours painstakingly freeing the skull from rock and debris.
Along with a complete skull, the fossil also includes the distinctive tail club, large parts of its spinal vertebral column and parts of its body armor, including two neck rings and spiked armor plates, the museum said in a statement.