Britain celebrates ‘Game of Thrones’ with new stamps

A handout picture released on January 4, 2018 shows British actor Kit Harington who plays Jon Snow, one of the the characters of the hit US show Game of Thrones, part of a new collection of stamps released by the Royal Mail. (AFP)
Updated 04 January 2018
0

Britain celebrates ‘Game of Thrones’ with new stamps

LONDON: Stars of “Game of Thrones” will appear on a new collection of stamps to celebrate Britain’s contribution to the fantasy series, Royal Mail announced.
Ten characters are pictured in the souvenir series unveiled on Wednesday, set against dramatic scenes from the hit US show.
Highlighting the prominence of British stars among the cast, the stamps feature actors Kit Harington, who plays Jon Snow, and Emilia Clarke (Daenerys Targaryen) among others.
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, from Denmark, and American Peter Dinklage are the two actors included who hail from elsewhere.
One of the stamps features an image of the series’ famous Iron Throne.
An additional five stamps feature non-human characters, including dragons and dire wolves, as part of the series which will be available from January 23.
Filmed largely in Northern Ireland, the fantasy epic has become a global phenomenon since its debut in 2010.
The latest seventh series has also featured British pop sensation Ed Sheeran, who did not make it into the Royal Mail collection.
The television series has won 38 Emmys, more than any other fictional show in history, and one Golden Globe award.
“Game of Thrones” is also a nominee for best drama series at this year’s Golden Globes, competing against shows including “The Handmaid’s Tale” and “The Crown.”


Exhibit highlights Wellington’s formative Indian years

A handout photograph recieved in London on March 25, 2019, shows the Deccan Dinner Service, a vast silver gilt service bought by Wellington's fellow officers in the Deccan region of India as a mark of their appreciation. (AFP)
Updated 26 March 2019
0

Exhibit highlights Wellington’s formative Indian years

  • The “Young Wellington in India” exhibition runs from Saturday until November 3 at Apsley House, which remains the Wellesley family’s London home, on the edge of Hyde Park

LONDON: An exhibition on the Duke of Wellington’s time in India opens in London Saturday, shedding light on formative years before he defeated French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo.
Between 1796 and 1804, as the young Arthur Wellesley, he helped overthrow the Tipu Sultan and masterminded victory in the Battle of Assaye.
A decade later he defeated Napoleon, paving the way for a century of relative peace in Europe and a time of vast British imperial expansion.
The collection includes a dinner service commemorating his leadership in India that was later supplemented with cutlery taken from Napoleon’s carriage.
It also includes books from the 200-volume traveling library that, aged 27, he took with him for the six-month voyage to India in a bid to broaden his education, having finished his studies early.
It included books on India’s history, politics and economics, Jonathan Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels” and philosophical works.
The “Young Wellington in India” exhibition runs from Saturday until November 3 at Apsley House, which remains the Wellesley family’s London home, on the edge of Hyde Park.
Charles Wellesley, 73, the ninth and current Duke of Wellington, said his great-great-great grandfather’s time in India set the stage for defeating Napoleon.
“It was very, very formative... There is no doubt that he learnt a great deal in India,” he said on Monday.
“Napoleon underestimated Wellington and the reason for this exhibition is to show how important in Wellington’s life was his period in India.”
The exhibition features swords, paintings and the Deccan Dinner Service, a vast silver gilt service bought by Wellington’s fellow officers in the Deccan region of India as a mark of their appreciation.
The cutlery for the service was taken from Napoleon after Waterloo and carries his imperial crest.
The service is still used by the family.
Josephine Oxley, keeper of the Wellington Collection, said the India years were “a time when he learned to meld the military and the political, and became skilled at negotiations with the locals.
“It’s a really interesting period of his life.”