Canine couture cuts a dash in Italy’s fashion capital

This file photo taken on December 05, 2017 shows fashion designer Giovanna Temellini (L) adjusting a coat on a greyhound dog in her workshop in Milan. (AFP)
Updated 07 January 2018
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Canine couture cuts a dash in Italy’s fashion capital

MILAN: Elegant, tailored outfits are not reserved just for fashionistas in Italy — couture for dogs is proving a hit with some Milan pet owners.
Man’s best friend should not be overlooked when it comes to cashmere sweaters and woollen coats, according to designer Giovanna Temellini, who enables the fashion conscious to match their style with that of their pooch.
“Everything is born out of love,” says the 57-year-old, who has been in the fashion industry for 25 years working for labels such as Bottega Veneta and Armani and is an active supporter of animal welfare groups.
One evening just under a year ago in her workshop, Temellini recalled, her daughter said to her: “You do so many little things for all the dogs...” referring to her animal protection voluntary work. “But when it rains, mine gets his ears all wet,” her daughter continued.
The following evening a member of her design team set to work making a hooded coat for the pet, to match the winter jacket of Temellini’s daughter.
From there sprung her made-to-measure fashion line just for dogs entitled Temellini Dog A Porter, with its first shop opening this month.
Her staff use a dog-shaped mannequin to create a range of sizes for different breeds, including dobermans, basset hounds and greyhounds.
But for each commission, the canine customer has its measurements taken to ensure a snug fit.
One dark grey jacket from her dogs’ range sports a high collar with buttons down the front, with the fabric matching a woman’s over-sized coat from Temellini’s main collection, for women, which she began 15 years ago.
But the focus on high-quality fabrics and stylish cuts means a cashmere T-shirt costs 142 euros ($171), a merino wool bomber jacket 212 euros and a coat with small pockets 252 euros.
One customer snapped up an entire wardrobe for his dog, adopted from a shelter, because after what she had been through, “she deserved it.”
Twenty-four year-old student, Beatrice Gerevini, who likes to coordinate her dog’s outfit with her own, said it helps the pair to “create a connection.”
It is also “a sort of game, a way of being noticed — people smile when they see us.”
Temellini, who continues to do some work for other labels too, says she wants to create a collection suitable for all dogs, including those with disabilities.
“I am very respectful and attentive to all the requirements of dogs which are to be able to move, run, get dirty and socialize.
“I refuse to do something that would restrict or ridicule a dog, because they’ll be aware of it.”


‘Blast fishing’ thrives in Libya’s chaos

A Libyan man buys fish from a fishmonger at the Fish market in Tripoli on August 4, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 20 August 2018
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‘Blast fishing’ thrives in Libya’s chaos

  • There is still hope as long as some good fishermen respect the trade and go out at night with nets
  • The practice has its critics, including marine biologists, fishermen, and even religious leaders

TRIPOLI: Residents of Tripoli’s seafront wake up most weekends to loud blasts: fishermen using dynamite to maximize their catch, regardless of the damage they are causing to marine life.
Dynamite fishing, or “blast fishing,” has flourished — with impunity — since Libya’s 2011 uprising that left the country awash with weapons and explosives.
The Mediterranean country has since descended into chaos and violence, with two rival administrations struggling to impose the law and a myriad of militias vying for control of its oil wealth.
As a result, protecting fish stock and the environment are not a priority for the authorities, experts and officials say.
Haytham Ali, a newly-married teacher, lives less than 50 meters (yards) from the beach in the capital’s residential suburb of Hay Al-Andalous.
“My wife and I enjoy the peace and quiet of Friday mornings in our garden by the sea, but the explosions... as early as 7 am remind us of all that is wrong in this country,” he said.
Mariam, a 64-year-old widow, said the blasts frighten her grandchildren when they come to visit her home near the water.
“My whole house and my old windows shake with every blast... and I have to reassure my grandchildren that it’s only people fishing, not NATO bombs all over again,” she said, referring to the uprising that was backed by the Western alliance.
Dynamite fishing and the use of explosives without a permit are both officially against the law, but dynamite fishermen appear to be immune.
They even post anonymous videos online of sea water being propelled high into the sky and dozens of dazed or dead fish left behind on the surface.
“We hear (the blasts) but no one can do anything about it,” said Bannour Abu Kahal, head of the fisheries department in Garaboulli, east of Tripoli.

Some marine biologists, fishermen and fishmongers, and even religious leaders have tried to speak out against blast fishing but to no avail.
Using dynamite to catch fish “depletes the fish stock in the sea,” said Mokhtar, a fishmonger in central Tripoli, who declined to give his surname.
“This practice is not correct or healthy for the consumer” because it stuns the fish and shreds its skin, he said.
The explosives, known as “gelatine” in Libya, “kills the fish, the fish roe, larvae and sea plants,” said Fathi Al-Zaytuni, a fishmonger who uses nets for his catch.
The explosive devices used in Libya are mostly home-made and have caused dozens of deaths and injuries, according to media reports.
Lana news agency reported in March that three men from the same family died in a blast in the eastern city of Sirte as they were preparing bombs for blast fishing.

Sheikh Sadek Al-Ghariani, the country’s disputed top religious figure, has also waded into the controversy.
“If this type of fishing is banned by laws that regulate fishing, or if it is prejudicial to man and the environment, then it should not be practiced,” he said in a fatwa, religious edict, issued in 2013.
Abu Kahal, the fishing director in Garaboulli, urged “concerned authorities, especially the coast guard, to do their job and put an end to this kind of fishing.”
On a warm and humid August evening, retired fisherman Abdelrazag Al-Bahri, 72, sat at Tripoli port counting the few fishing boats heading out to sea to catch sardines.
“There is still hope as long as some good fishermen respect the trade” and go out at night to haul a catch the traditional way with nets, he said.
He said traditional fishing in Libya had mostly been the work of Egyptians and Tunisians but they had fled the country, with few Libyans now willing to replace them.