Global sukuk issuance looks ‘uncertain’ for 2018, says S&P Global

The outlook for Islamic bonds remains 'uncertain' for the coming year, according to ratings agency S&P Global. (Reuters)
Updated 09 January 2018
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Global sukuk issuance looks ‘uncertain’ for 2018, says S&P Global

LONDON: While 2017 was a bumper year for global sukuk issuance, the outlook for Islamic bonds remains "uncertain" for the coming year, according to ratings agency S&P Global.
Global sukuk issuance in 2017 reached $97.9 billion, an increase of 45.3 percent, from the $67.4 billion recorded in 2016. The increase was underpinned by large issuances by GCC countries, particularly the $9 billion sukuk issued by Saudi Arabia in April. This remains the largest issuance globally to date.

"Driving this performance were good liquidity conditions in the GCC and, more generally, globally, as well as activity by some countries with the goal of further developing their Islamic finance industries," said Dr Mohamed Damak, head of Islamic finance, at the ratings agency.
Non-GCC countries also contributed to the rise, said S&P Global, with Hong Kong tapping the market again last year and Nigeria issuing its first sukuk. Morocco and Tunisia are expected to issue sukuks this year, according to the report.
The report said while core Islamic finance countries will continue to have “significant” financing needs in 2018, the sukuk market could be held back by tightening global liquidity and rising geopolitical risks in the Middle East.
The report cited sanctions imposed on Qatar by a group of Arab states in June 2017, as well as continued animosity between Iran and GCC countries as factors that may undermine investor interest in the product.
It also suggested that the “slow progress” on standardizing Islamic finance products will limit the market’s potential. S&P Global expects issuance volumes to hover nearer $70-80 billion in 2018, according to the report.


Turkey set to begin oil and gas drilling off Cyprus

Updated 21 February 2019
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Turkey set to begin oil and gas drilling off Cyprus

  • “In the coming days we will start drilling with two ships around Cyprus,” Turkish foreign minister said
  • Turkey and the Cypriot government have overlapping claims of jurisdiction in the eastern Mediterranean

ISTANBUL: Turkey will begin drilling for oil and gas near Cyprus in coming days, state-owned news agency Anadolu reported Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu saying on Thursday, a move that could stoke tensions with neighboring Cyprus and Greece.
Turkey and the internationally recognized Greek Cypriot government have overlapping claims of jurisdiction for offshore oil and gas research in the eastern Mediterranean, a region thought to be rich in natural gas.
“In the coming days we will start drilling with two ships around Cyprus,” Cavusoglu was quoted as saying in a speech to a business conference in western Turkey’s Aydin province.
“Let those who come to the region from far away, and their companies, see that nothing can be done in that region without us. Nothing at all can be done in the Mediterranean without Turkey, we will not allow that,” Cavusoglu said.
Turkey launched its first drillship “Fatih” in October to drill off the coast of Turkey’s southern Antalya province. It said a second ship that it purchased would operate in the Black Sea, but was diverted to the Cyprus area.
Breakaway north Cyprus, which is supported by Turkey, says any offshore wealth also belongs to them, as partners in the establishment of the Republic of Cyprus in 1960.
The island was divided in 1974 after a Turkish invasion triggered by a brief Greek-inspired coup. Countless peacemaking endeavours have failed, and offshore wealth has increasingly complicated peace negotiations, with Greek Cypriots saying the matter is not up for discussion.