Saudi Citizen Account Program processes nearly 145,000 applications since February ‘17 launch

Updated 09 January 2018
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Saudi Citizen Account Program processes nearly 145,000 applications since February ‘17 launch

The Saudi Citizen Account Program – which provides economic support to nationals – has handled 144,965 documents proving applicants eligibility for payments since its launch in February 2017, the Saudi state news agency (SPA) reported.

The program is a national scheme that was created to protect Saudi households from the expected impact — direct and indirect — of economic reforms. Recipients receive support through direct cash transfers.

Aimed at simplifying government benefits, the aim of the program is to improve the level of services provided to Saudi citizens, raise the efficiency of government spending and operation, and create greater transparently and effective payment to those most needing of assistance.

The support compensates for the increase in prices, as a result of the change in electricity and petrol prices, and the application of VAT on food and drink.

The allowances will be reviewed every three months, ensuring that households receive payments that meets their changing requirements.

People who have been unsuccessful in their applications for the allowance have the right to appeal on the website www.ca.gov.sa. Those who choose to appeal against an unsuccessful application have three months to do so, and will be able to track the status of the objection through the portal until receiving a message with the result of the objection.

Successful appeals will then receive a back payment for the relevant time – up to a maximum of five months.


US’ Mnuchin says talk about sanctions premature, will visit Riyadh to meet with counterpart

Updated 21 October 2018
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US’ Mnuchin says talk about sanctions premature, will visit Riyadh to meet with counterpart

JERUSALEM, Oct 21 : US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Sunday it was premature to comment on possible US sanctions against Saudi Arabia for the death of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi until an investigation had been completed.
Mnuchin said information so far on the investigation was “a good first step but not enough” as Riyadh faced increasing international pressure over what happened to Khashoggi, who disappeared after he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2.
US President Donald Trump, who has said the United States would consider sanctions against Saudi Arabia, emphasized on Saturday that he was not satisfied with the Saudis’ handling of the case.
“It would be premature to comment on sanctions and premature to comment on really any issues until we get further down the investigation and get to the bottom of what occurred,” Mnuchin told reporters in Jerusalem.
Mnuchin confirmed that he would not attend a Saudi investment conference on Tuesday. However, he said he would visit Riyadh as planned for talks with his counterpart on joint efforts to counter terrorist financing and plans by Washington to reimpose sanctions against Iran in November.
“I did not think it was appropriate to go and speak at this conference but we continue to have important issues with Saudi and that is why I am going there,” Mnuchin said.
The visit, he said, was necessary as Washington prepares to reimpose sanctions against Iran.
He said he had no reason to believe that Saudi Arabia would renege on commitments to make up for any shortfall in global oil supplies as Iranian oil exports are curbed under the sanctions.
“I have no reason to believe that they are not going to honor those commitments,” said Mnuchin, who will meet Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih while in Riyadh.