Visa rule for expats going to work in UAE requires proof of ‘good behavior’

The new requirement will take effect from Feb. 4, 2018, but will not be required for visit and tourist visas, the report added. (Shutterstock)
Updated 09 January 2018
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Visa rule for expats going to work in UAE requires proof of ‘good behavior’

People applying for a residency and work visa in the UAE will be required to supply a certificate of good conduct, state news agency WAM reported.
The new requirement will take effect from Feb. 4, 2018, but will not be required for visit and tourist visas, the report added.
The certificate must be issued by the expat’s home country, or the country they have lived in for the last five years – although the report did not state which organizations should provide the document.
But the report added that the document must be attested by UAE embassies, or oversees Customer Happiness Centers at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation.
The new rule comes as the UAE continues to push for safe and secure environment in the country.
Arab News has tried contacting the UAE government to get more information regarding the process, but at the time of publishing the story had received no response.


Arab anger over ‘theft of occupied Golan Heights’

Updated 44 min 7 sec ago
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Arab anger over ‘theft of occupied Golan Heights’

  • Israel seized part of the Golan during the 1967 Six-Day War, subsequently annexing it in 1981
  • US President Trump officially recognized Israel's sovereignty of the Golan Heights on March 25, 2019

JEDDAH: Arab states on Monday condemned US President Donald Trump’s recognition of the occupied Golan Heights as Israeli territory.

The decision “does not change the area’s status” as illegally occupied territory, Arab League Secretary-General Ahmed Aboul Gheit said.

Breaking decades of international consensus, Trump signed a proclamation at the White House on Monday recognizing Israeli sovereignty over the border area that Israel seized from Syria in 1967. 

Syria said the decision was a blatant attack on its sovereignty. 

“Trump does not have the right or the legal authority to legitimize the occupation,” a Foreign Ministry spokesman said.

Opposition chief Nasr Al-Hariri said Trump’s decision would “lead to more violence and instability, and it will have negative effects on efforts to engineer peace in the region.”

Lebanon said the move “violates all the rules of international law” and “undermines any effort to reach a just peace.”

“The Golan Heights are Syrian Arab land, no decision can change this, and no country can revisit history by transferring ownership of land from one country to another,” the Foreign Ministry said.