Oil flirts with $70, but is the market overheating?

The Mellitah Oil and Gas terminal on the outskirts of Zwara in western Libya. Mellitah Oil and Gas is a joint venture between Italy’s ENI and Libya’s National Oil Company and the Greenstream pipeline runs from Mellitah to Gela in Sicily. (AFP)
Updated 10 January 2018
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Oil flirts with $70, but is the market overheating?

LONDON: Brent crude continued to hover near $70 per barrel on Wednesday with prices up 15 percent since early December, but some cautioned the oil market could be overheating.
Jean-Pierre Durante, head of quantitative research at Swiss bank Pictet, told Arab News the “price doesn’t seem justified on our fundamentals.”
Pictet is forecasting an average 2018 price of $63 per barrel, close to a recently revised figure of $62 per barrel predicted by Goldman Sachs.
Durante said oil was benefiting from bullishness about the global outlook — with stock markets buzzing, in part due to President Trump’s success in pushing through tax cuts at the end of 2017.
“For the fist time since the financial crisis we have synchronized growth around the world, in both advanced and emerging markets,” said Durante.
But he added: “Non-conventional production, in particular US shale oil, is expected to continue to play an important role in 2018 and 2019, forcing OPEC to keep restraining production.
The price has been buoyed recently by geopolitical tensions in the Middle East, protests in Iran and fears about further disruption of supplies from strife-hit Venezuela, said Durante.
He also pointed to recent data from the American Petroleum Institute that showed US crude inventories fell by 11.2 million barrels in the week to Jan. 5 to 416.6 million barrels.
However, the US Energy Information Administration on Wednesday forecast that US oil production would exceed 11 million barrels per day (bpd) by the end of 2019, shattering previous records as American producers exploit higher prices to bring more shale to market.
Heightened US activity could weaken the price despite an extension of supply constraints agreed by OPEC and non-OPEC countries at a meeting in Vienna in November.
Worldwide, the agency sees oil consumption rising by about 1.7 million bpd in both 2018 and 2019, led by China and India.
Investors have been piling into oil since December with the Financial Times reporting on Monday that the net long position in Brent crept up to a record high of 565,459 contracts — or more than half a billion barrels of oil. Combined with West Texas Intermediate, the US oil benchmark, speculators have amassed bullish bets over 1 billion barrels of crude, said the FT.
But another warning about a possible bubble has come from Commerzbank’s Eugen Weinberg, head of commodities research, who told CNBC that the price was likely to correct by at least 10 to 15 percent over the coming months “because the current fundamentals are not justifying this kind of strength,” he said.


‘Get prices down’ Trump tells OPEC

Updated 20 September 2018
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‘Get prices down’ Trump tells OPEC

  • Trump highlights US security role in region
  • Comments come ahead of oil producers meeting in Algeria

LONDON: US president Donald Trump urged OPEC to lower crude prices on Thursday while reminding Mideast oil exporters of US security support.
He made his remarks on Twitter ahead of a keenly awaited meeting of OPEC countries and its allies in Algiers this weekend as pressure mounts on them to prevent a spike in prices caused by the reimposition of oil sanctions on Iran.
“We protect the countries of the Middle East, they would not be safe for very long without us, and yet they continue to push for higher and higher oil prices!” he tweeted.
“We will remember. The OPEC monopoly must get prices down now!”
Despite the threat, the group and its allies are unlikely to agree to an official increase in output, Reuters reported on Thursday, citing OPEC sources.
In June they agreed to increase production by about one million barrels per day (bpd). That decision was was spurred by a recovery in oil prices, in part caused by OPEC and its partners agreeing to lower production since 2017.
Known as OPEC+, the group of oil producers which includes Russia are due to meet on Sunday in Algiers to look at how to allocate the additional one million bpd within its quote a framework.
OPEC sources told Reuters that there was no immediate plan for any official action as such a move would require OPEC to hold what it calls an extraordinary meeting, which is not on the table.
Oil prices slipped after Trumps remarks, with Brent crude shedding 40 cents to $79 a barrel in early afternoon trade in London while US light crude was unchanged at about $71.12.
Brent had been trading at around $80 on expectations that global supplies would come under pressure from the introduction of US sanctions on Iranian crude exports on Nov. 4.
Some countries has already started to halt imports from Tehran ahead of that deadline, leading analysts to speculate about how much spare capacity there is in the Middle East to compensate for the loss of Iranian exports as well as how much of that spare capacity can be easily brought online after years of under-investment in the industry.
Analysts expect oil to trend higher and through the $80 barrier as the deadline for US sanctions approaches.
“Brent is definitely fighting the $80 line, wanting to break above,” said SEB Markets chief commodities analyst Bjarne Schieldrop, Reuters reported. “But this is likely going to break very soon.”