Oman issues human rights handbook for workers amid labor abuse claims

Concrete works at a construction site in Oman, Nov. 29, 2015. (Shutterstock)
Updated 11 January 2018
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Oman issues human rights handbook for workers amid labor abuse claims

DUBAI: A handbook on human rights has been issued for expat workers in Oman after a series of complaints were made claiming abuse, Times of Oman reported on Wednesday.
The guide outlines various ways of resolving complaints made by workers against their employers.
The information for migrant workers includes advice not to take illegal actions, such as “leaving work, going on strike or running away,” as these actions could lead to legal actions being taken against them. Instead the guide suggests workers discuss problems with their employer first.
“The OHRC received and monitored a number of labor cases related to the non-Omani labor force in recent times,” an Oman Human Rights Commission spokesman explained. They added: “Most of these cases involved domestic workers and other labor issues relating to salaries, adequate housing, and other rights.”
It also states that labor syndicates and trade unions should be involved. According to the report, there are more than 230 syndicates and trade unions in Oman.
In situations where people have been brought into the country illegally through human trafficking or are used illegally beyond the terms of their employment contract, the handbook advises that people should approach the National Committee for Combating Human Trafficking.


High praise for weed bust: Facebook leads Myanmar police to marijuana-growing Americans

Updated 25 April 2019
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High praise for weed bust: Facebook leads Myanmar police to marijuana-growing Americans

  • Police raided the 20-acre site in Ngunzun township Monday to find nearly 350,000 marijuana plants
  • Seizures of heroin, pills and crystal meth by authorities are more common in Myanmar

YANGON: Myanmar police have arrested one American and two locals after photos on Facebook led them to a huge plantation of towering marijuana plants near Mandalay.
Pictures of the fields of weed started circulating on the platform last week — a rare sight online in a country where police photos of seized heroin and methamphetamine are far more common.
Police raided the 20-acre site in Ngunzun township Monday to find nearly 350,000 marijuana plants — some up to two meters tall — 380 kilograms of seeds and 270 kilograms of marijuana, the Central Committee for Drug Abuse Control (CCDAC) announced Wednesday.
A released photo showed arrested US citizen John Fredric Todoroki, 63, standing alongside Myanmar nationals Shein Latt, 37, and Ma Shun Le Myat Noe, 23.
Another man, 49-year-old Alexander Skemp Todoroki, is still “at large,” the CCDAC said.
Police confirmed he is also American.
The detainees have been charged under the Anti-Narcotics Drug and Psychotropic Substances Law, though it remains unclear what penalties they will face if found guilty.
“We didn’t know this (marijuana plantation) existed,” one local police officer said, asking not to be named.
“We only found out when we were tipped off about it.”
Seizures of heroin, pills and crystal meth by authorities are more common in Myanmar, where weak rule of law and conflict-riddled border areas allow for the industrial-scale production of harder drugs.
Reaction on Facebook was swift, with some offering high praise for the arrests.
Others questioned how the pot growers had been able to get away with it for so long.
“How could the plants have grown so big without you allowing it?” Facebook user Kg Zoe Law commented at the police.
But not everyone’s nose was put out of joint by the agronomists’ antics.
“Let me know where it’ll be burned so I can get in position,” San Yu Ko Ko pleaded.