Roger Federer landed in tough half of draw at Australian Open

Updated 11 January 2018
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Roger Federer landed in tough half of draw at Australian Open

LONDON: Roger Federer has been given a tough task if he is to defend his Australian Open title.
The Swiss sensation memorably won in Melbourne 12 months ago to claim his 19th Grand Slam title. The 36-year-old goes into the year’s first major as overwhelming favorite with many of his big rivals either out (Andy Murray) or just back from injury (Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic).
But Federer is all too aware there are no easy paths to Slam success and he found out he is not only in the same half of the draw as Djokovic but also the same quarter as world No. 7 David Goffin, Juan Martin del Potro, Sam Querrey, and Milos Raonic.
Federer beat Nadal in the final last year on his return from six months on the sidelines and is seeded No. 2 as he bids for a 20th Grand Slam singles title. The Swiss gets his title defence off against Ajaz Bedene of Slovenia.
Djokovic is in the same quarter as the Zverev brothers — fourth-seeded Alexander could meet older brother and 32nd seed Mischa in the third round — 2014 champion Stan Wawrinka, and world No. 5 Dominic Thiem.
Djokovic had a contrasting 2017, starting the year as world No. 2 but losing in a second-round upset at the Australian Open and not playing again after Wimbledon. It was the first year since 2009 that Djokovic did not reach at least one Grand Slam final. He delayed his return until two exhibition appearances this week.
Top-ranked Nadal will open against Victor Estrella Burgos, has a potential fourth-round match against John Isner, and world No. 3 Grigor Dimitrov in his half of the draw. He followed his run to the final in Melbourne by winning the French Open and US Open, splitting the Grand Slam honors with Federer for the year.
In the women’s draw Venus Williams, who lost the all-Williams Australian Open final last year, has a tough opener against Belinda Bencic — who combined with Federer to win the Hopman Cup for Switzerland last week — and is also in the same quarter as US Open winner Sloane Stephens.
Top-ranked Simona Halep opens against Australian wildcard Destanee Aiava, has a potential second-round match against 2014 Wimbledon finalist Eugenie Bouchard, and is in the same half as Garbine Muruguza, the Wimbledon champion.
Third-seeded Muguruza is in a difficult quarter containing former Australian Open champions Maria Sharapova and Angelique Kerber, and US Open finalist Madison Keys.


Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

Updated 14 November 2018
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Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

LONDON: A Saudi Arabian businessman is driving the bid to get squash included in the Olympics for the first time.
The World Squash Federation has petitioned three times for squash to join the Games, but each bid has been rejected by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The decision has prompted frustration in the squash community, particularly as sports such as climbing, surfing and skateboarding have been admitted.
Ziad Al-Turki is the Chairman of the Professional Squash Association (PSA) and has done wonders in marketing the game and broadening its appeal. He is now pushing hard for the game to be showcased on the biggest stage of all at the 2024 Olympics Games in Paris.
Squash has huge global appeal, with the men’s singles final in the last Commonwealth Games attracting a TV audience of more than one million.
“Everyone’s ultimate goal is the Olympics,” said Al-Turki. “The main push comes from the World Squash Federation (WSF) and for many years they were stuck in their ways. We changed a lot at the PSA and ticked every box with the IOC. The WSF just stayed stagnant and didn’t do anything. They didn’t want to put our hand in their hand and work together.”
Relations between the PSA and the WSF came to a head in 2015 in the wake of squash losing out to wrestling for a spot at the 2020 Olympics. A statement from the PSA described the then president of WSF, Narayana Ramachandran, as an “embarrassment to the sport.”
“Nothing could happen with the president of the WSF. Nothing would change. It was just a one-man show. We tried to help but he wouldn’t accept any help,” Al-Turki said. “We have a new president now and they are all very keen,” he added.
Jacques Fontaine is the new president and at his coronation in 2016 he encouragingly said “the Olympic agenda remains a priority.”
“The WSF love the sport and they understand the needs of the IOC,” said Al-Turki.
“They understand the PSA is at a completely different level to the WSF and we’ve now joined forces and are working together. Hopefully 2024 will be the year squash is in the Olympics. Right now, the way we are working together is the strongest collaboration ever and hopefully we can tick all the boxes for the IOC.
“We ticked all the right bodies as a professional association but the WSF didn’t. Now they are putting their hands in ours and we will tick all the right boxes for the ICO.”
Al-Turki, once described as the Bernie Ecclestone of squash, has certainly transformed the sport since he took up office in 2008.
“When I joined the PSA we didn’t have any media coverage,” he said. “Right now we are live in 154 countries. the women’s tour has just grown stronger and stronger — the income has gone up by 74 percent.
“I just love the squash players. I think they are incredible athletes are are some of the fittest athletes in the world. I felt they deserved better and I wanted them to have better.
“I don’t think we’ll be able to reach the levels of football and tennis in terms of exposure and prize money, but I want to reach a level where they will retire comfortably. It’s one of the fastest growing sports in the world right now.
“It’s all about the player and their well being. Nick Matthew retired recently and I think he’s retired comfortably. I think I’ve contributed to this as the income has improved. That’s all I want – nothing more.”