Tickets go on sale as Saudi Arabia opens football stadiums to women

Friday's match will be held at the King Abdullah Sports City stadium in Jeddah where 14,000 seats have been reserved for families. (SPA)
Updated 11 January 2018
0

Tickets go on sale as Saudi Arabia opens football stadiums to women

LONDON: Family tickets have gone on sale for football games in Saudi Arabia following a move to allow women into stadiums.
The General Sports Authority announced that tickets for a match to be held on Friday at the King Abdullah Sports City stadium in Jeddah and another to be held on Saturday at the King Fahd International Stadium in Riyadh have gone on sale and that families and individuals can purchase them, SPA reported.
Tickets are available for the Al-Ahli vs. Al-Batin match in Jeddah and the Al-Hilal vs. Al-Ittihad game in Riyadh.
There are 7,500 family seats available at King Fahd International Stadium, and 14,000 at King Abdullah Sports City.
Maps have been released showing which entrances should be used to gain access to the family areas.
Friday’s match will be the first time Saudi women will be able to watch football at the King Abdullah Sport City stadium in Jeddah.
The decision allowing women to enter stadiums was first announced on Oct. 29, a month after a historical royal decree lifting the ban on women driving.


Saudi Arabia ‘strongly condemns’ Houthi attack on Yemen UN monitors

Updated 20 min 2 sec ago
0

Saudi Arabia ‘strongly condemns’ Houthi attack on Yemen UN monitors

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia on Friday strongly condemned the targeting of “UN personnel by the Iran-backed Houthi militia in Yemen” after cease-fire monitors came under fire.
The attack took place on Thursday in Hodeidah, where a truce agreed in talks in Sweden came into force last month.
The Houthi militia “have violated their signed commitments in Stockholm and continue to flout international law and escalate their aggression against the Yemeni people,” Saudi Arabia’s Ambassador to the United States Prince Khalid bin Salman tweeted on Friday.


The UN said one round of small arms fire struck a UN-marked armored vehicle that was part of convoy carrying chief monitor Patrick Cammaert.
The UN monitors arrived in Hodeida — the entry point for the bulk of Yemen’s imports — on Dec. 23. The UN Security Council this week agreed to expand the force to 75 monitors.