US president denies derogatory remarks against migrant countries

In this Jan. 8, 2018 photo, Mateo Barrera, 4 originally from El Salvador, whose family members benefit from Temporary Protected Status, TPS, attends a news conference in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Updated 13 January 2018
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US president denies derogatory remarks against migrant countries

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump tweeted a denial on Friday after he was quoted as describing African and other states as “sh**hole countries,” amid an international furor over the remarks.
Trump, who reportedly made the comment during a meeting with legislators Thursday on immigration reform, drew charges of racism.
“Why are we having all these people from sh**hole countries come here?” Trump said, people briefed on the meeting told The Washington Post.
The New York Times later reported the same comment, citing unnamed people with direct knowledge of the meeting.
“The language used by me at the DACA meeting was tough, but this was not the language used,” Trump tweeted early Friday.
The reference was to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which shields from deportation nearly 800,000 immigrants brought to the country illegally as children.
Thursday’s meeting was to discuss a compromise under which DACA would be preserved but a visa lottery and a policy allowing legal immigrants to bring family members into the country would be ended.
“I want a merit based system of immigration and people who will help take our country to the next level,” Trump said in another tweet.
“I want safety and security for our people,” he added, criticizing the proposed bipartisan deal.
“USA would be forced to take large numbers of people from high crime countries which are doing badly,” Trump tweeted.
The Post and the Times said Trump’s vulgar remark on Thursday was in reference to African countries and Haiti. The Post included El Salvador on its list.
Trump suggested the US should instead welcome immigrants from places like Norway, whose prime minister met with Trump on Wednesday.
UN rights office spokesman Rupert Colville said “there is no other word one can use but ‘racist’” to describe Trump’s remarks.
Democratic Congressman Luis Gutierrez called Trump “a racist who does not share the values enshrined in our Constitution.”
The 55-nation African Union condemned Trump’s reported remarks while the southern African state of Botswana hauled in the US ambassador to complain.
The comment “truly flies in the face of accepted behavior and practice,” said Ebba Kalondo, spokeswoman for AU chief Moussa Faki.
“This is even more hurtful given the historical reality of just how many Africans arrived in the United States as slaves, and also terribly surprising as the United States remains a massively positive example as just how migration can give birth to a nation,” Kalondo said.
The comments were “clearly” racist, Kalondo said, but stressed the US was “much stronger than the sum total of one man.”
Botswana summoned the US ambassador to the country to “clarify if Botswana is regarded as a ‘sh**hole’ country,” according to a Foreign Ministry statement which called Trump’s comments “irresponsible, reprehensible and racist.”
This is not the first time Trump has rubbed Africans up the wrong way — he was widely derided last year after he twice referred to Namibia as “Nambia.”
Many Africans reminded the US of its historic role in the continent’s woes.


Brazil front-runner accused of illegal campaign practices

Bolsonaro said Haddad’s campaign was trying to change the subject. (AFP)
Updated 19 October 2018
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Brazil front-runner accused of illegal campaign practices

  • Businessmen linked to Bolsonaro allegedly bankrolled the spread of fake news on the WhatsApp messaging service to benefit his candidacy
  • Bolsonaro said any support of businessmen was voluntary

SAO PAULO: A Brazilian presidential candidate on Thursday accused his far-right adversary of illegal campaign practices for allegedly allowing friendly businessmen to secretly pay to spread slanderous messages.
The accusations by left-leaning Fernando Haddad follow a report published by the newspaper Folha de S.Paulo saying businessmen linked to Congressman Jair Bolsonaro allegedly bankrolled the spread of fake news on the WhatsApp messaging service to benefit his candidacy. The article said a blast message campaign was planned for the week before the Oct. 28 runoff.
In a series of tweets, Bolsonaro, who is the front-runner in opinion polls, said any support of businessmen was voluntary. Gustavo Bebbiano, the chairman of Bolsonaro’s Social Liberal Party, denied receiving illegal donations.
“Every donation made until this day, no matter if it is our party or our candidate’s campaign, comes from resources donated to our platform, accordingly with legislation,” Bebbiano said
Haddad, who was hand-picked by jailed former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, said he has leads for the federal police to follow, but did not reveal names. He later asked Brazil’s top court to start an investigation, and he said he might take the case to the Organization of American States.
“There has been a criminal organization of businessmen which used illegal campaign financing to promote this candidacy and tamper with the election in the first round (on Oct. 7). And they want to do it again in the runoff,” Haddad said. “We estimate that hundreds of thousands of messages, all fake, were sent to voters to suggest they voted for my rival.”
Paying for the blast-messaging, if true, could be a violation of Brazil’s campaign finance laws since companies are barred from giving money to candidates, electoral lawyer Erick Pereira said.
“But there is still need for robust evidence, which is not here at this moment,” Pereira added.
The Folha article mentioned businessman Luciano Hang, who owns the Havan department store, as one of the contributors. It also mentioned a handful of marketing companies that allegedly received money to do the blast messaging.
In an emailed statement, the Havan chain said the newspaper “published fake news with a clear ideological slant,” adding it would sue over the article.
At Yacows, an Internet marketing service mentioned in the article, a person answered the phone and said there would be no comment because the company did not engage in spreading messages.
The other companies mentioned in the article didn’t answer their phones Thursday afternoon.
In his tweet, Bolsonaro said Haddad’s campaign was trying to change the subject.
“The Workers’ Party is not being affected by fake news, it is affected by the truth,” Bolsonaro wrote. “They stole the population’s money, were arrested, confronted the judiciary, disrespected families and made the country sink into violence and chaos.”
On Thursday, a Datafolha poll said Bolsonaro keeps a comfortable advantage over Haddad, with 59 percent support against his adversary’s 41 percent. The polling firm said it interviewed 9,137 voters Wednesday and Thursday and the poll had a margin of error of two percentage points.