Saudi Binladin Group ‘still a private sector company’

Saudi Bin Laden Group Company (SBG) has asserted that it remains a private sector company owned by its shareholders. ​(Archive)
Updated 14 January 2018
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Saudi Binladin Group ‘still a private sector company’

JEDDAH: Saudi Binladin Group (SBG) on Saturday said it remains a private sector company owned by its shareholders, according to a statement sent to Arab News.
Earlier unconfirmed reports issued by some media outlets suggested that the Saudi government had taken over SBG, the Kingdom’s construction giant which has worked on dozens of megaprojects over the decades.
SBG also confirmed that contracted work with the government, which remains a significant part of its activities, is ongoing. This includes projects currently operating in the two holy mosques and the Zamzam rehabilitation project, which began months ago and is expected to end before Ramadan 2018.
Based on information available to SBG management, some shareholders may have agreed a settlement that involves transferring some SBG shares to the government of Saudi Arabia against outstanding dues.
SBG said this was a positive step and is currently restructuring its governance and executive management team to meet its commitment toward all stakeholders, according to the statement.
Restructuring efforts started two years ago with the objective of separating ownership from management in accordance with best governance standards.
To support those efforts, a supervisory committee was created. The committee is composed of five members, including three independent members — Dr. Abdulrehman Hamad Al-Harkan, Dr. Khaled Hamza Nahas and Khaled Mohammed Al-Khowaiter — and two members from the shareholders group, Yahia Mohammed Binladin and Abdullah Mohammed Binladin.
The committee will restructure the group and empower the new executive management to lead the projects and overcome the current challenges, leading the company to be profitable again, the statement said.
SBG, which had more than 100,000 employees at its height, is the biggest builder in Saudi Arabia. It was hit hard after the crash in oil prices, which led to construction projects and government contracts being scrapped or delayed. The company was forced to lay off thousands of workers.
The contractor also suffered a temporary exclusion from new state contracts after a crane accident killed 107 people at Makkah’s Grand Mosque in 2015.


Saudi Aramco aims to buy controlling stake in SABIC — sources

Updated 35 min 44 sec ago
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Saudi Aramco aims to buy controlling stake in SABIC — sources

  • Riyadh-listed SABIC, the world’s fourth-biggest petrochemicals firm, has a market capitalization of 385.2 billion Saudi riyals
  • The potential acquisition would affect the time frame of Aramco’s planned initial public offering set for later this year

DUBAI: Saudi Aramco aims to buy a controlling stake in petrochemical maker SABIC, possibly taking the entire 70 percent stake owned by Saudi Arabia’s sovereign wealth fund, two sources familiar with the matter told Reuters.
Late last week Aramco confirmed a Reuters report that it was working on a possible purchase of a “strategic stake” in Saudi Basic Industries Corp. (SABIC) from the Public Investment Fund, the kingdom’s top sovereign wealth fund.
Aramco’s initial thinking is to buy the full stake owned by the Public Investment Fund (PIF), but if that fails to materialize Aramco could end up with a stake in SABIC of more than 50 percent, making it a majority owner, the sources said.
No final decision has been made on the size of the stake as the discussions are still at a very early stage, they added.
Aramco declined to comment. The PIF did not respond to a Reuters request for comment.
Riyadh-listed SABIC, the world’s fourth-biggest petrochemicals firm, has a market capitalization of 385.2 billion Saudi riyals ($103 billion).
The potential acquisition would affect the time frame of Aramco’s planned initial public offering set for later this year, the state oil giant’s chief executive, Amin Nasser, said in a TV interview on Friday.
Aramco plans to boost investments in refining and petrochemicals to secure new markets and sees growth in chemicals as central to its downstream strategy to cut the risk of an oil demand slowdown.
Aramco plans to raise its refining capacity to between 8 million and 10 million barrels per day, from around 5 million bpd now, and double its petrochemicals production by 2030.
Aramco, the world’s largest oil producer, pumps around 10 million bpd of crude oil.