Japan sewers clean up their act with manhole art

A worker installs a designed manhole cover in Tokyo. (AFP)
Updated 14 January 2018
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Japan sewers clean up their act with manhole art

TOKYO: Japan’s sewerage industry has found a way to clean up its dirty and smelly image: Elaborately designed and colorful manhole covers with 12,000 local varieties nationwide — including, of course, a Hello Kitty design.
Appealing to a Japanese love of detail and “kawaii” (“cute“), bespoke manhole covers adorn the streets of 1,700 towns, cities and villages across Japan and have spawned a collection craze among so-called “manholers.”
The designs represent an instant guide to a place as they feature its history, folklore, or speciality goods: A castle design for an ancient town, a bay bridge for a port and Mt Fuji for a city at the foot of Japan’s iconic mountain.
As for Tama City, located in the western sprawl of greater Tokyo, locals are pinning their hopes on a more modern Japanese icon — Hello Kitty — to attract tourists, alongside the town’s theme park showcasing much-loved children’s character from the Sanrio company.
“We’d be happy if people come and take some time for a stroll in our town while looking for the Hello Kitty manholes,” said Mikio Narashima, who heads the city’s sewage system division, after the city installed the first of the 10 designed covers.
Veteran spotter Shoji Morimoto said his passion for covers was fueled after noticing that the central city of Fukui sported two phoenixes on its manholes.
He later learned the imaginary birds were a symbol of the town’s rise from a 1945 devastating US air raid and a deadly earthquake three years later.
“I sometimes do research on why the town has that particular design. I’m impressed whenever I find out it represents the town’s history and culture,” said Morimoto, who coined the word “manholer” for like-minded people.
Designed manholes cost more but appeal to a Japanese sense of detail, the 48-year-old Morimoto told AFP.
He has already visited all the designed manholes in his local area. “Now I have to travel far,” he admits.
“Manholers” take pictures of the covers they visit, with the more obsessive taking rubbings.
For others, the interest lies more in “cover bonsai,” plants growing on soil accumulated on and around covers.
More than 3,000 people attended a “manhole summit” in western Japan in November.
And manhole covers are not simply there to hide away dirty sewers, enthuses Tetsuro Sasabe, who is interested in covers for telecoms infrastructure.
“I’m interested in why the manhole is there, where it leads to — I’d say I’m interested in what’s under the manhole covers,” he said.
He noted that there is a story even to plain covers — such as finding the logos of now-defunct companies.
Given their size, the covers cannot easily be collected in the same way people hoard stamps and coins.
But to satisfy collectors’ desire, the private-public GKP network designed to promote awareness on the importance of sewerage in society, has released 1.4 million cards of 293 different covers.


Baghdad gun shops thrive after Iraqi rethink on arms control

Updated 19 August 2018
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Baghdad gun shops thrive after Iraqi rethink on arms control

  • Shop owner sees increasing demand from women, says self-defence is main reason for buying
  • Customer says legalized gun sales will act as crime deterrent

BAGHDAD: In the middle of Baghdad’s busy commercial neighborhood of Karrada, where most retail outlets sell home appliances, shoppers can now also buy handguns and semi-automatic rifles legally for the first time in decades.
After the toppling of Saddam Hussein in 2003, illegal weapons trade flourished across the country. Looted guns from ransacked police stations and military bases were sold in streets and public areas to residents seeking to protect themselves in a state that was largely lawless.
The authorities have since been battling to curb illegal weapon sales and the government has stepped up efforts to control gun ownership through regulation.
The latest initiative came into force this summer and allows citizens to own and carry handguns, semi-automatic rifles and other assault weapons after obtaining official authorization and an identity card that also details the individual’s weapons.
Previously, gun sales were restricted to firearms for hunting and sport.
Hamza Maher opened his new gun shop in Karrada after receiving official approval from the Interior Ministry and says there has been growing demand for his wares.
“Customers are mainly men, but the number of women buyers is growing,” said Maher inside his shop, where a variety of pistols and assault rifles are on display.
“The reason for buying is self-defense, and it’s safer for citizens to buy a weapon from an authorized store instead of from an unknown source.”
Pistol prices in Maher’s shop range from $1,000 to $4,000, while Kalashnikov assault rifles can be had from as little as $400 up to $2,000, depending on the brand and manufacturing origin, he said.
Haider Al-Suhail, a tribal sheikh from Baghdad, welcomed the legalization of gun stores.
“Yes, it will decrease crime,” he said on a visit to Maher’s shop to buy assault rifles for his ranch guards. “The criminal who plans to attack others will understand that he will pay heavy price.”