Google’s selfie-to-painting match feature takes social media by storm

British politician Edward Miliband seems uncannily similar to an Italian portrait at the Museo Poldi Pezzoli. (Photo courtesy: Twitter)
Updated 16 January 2018
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Google’s selfie-to-painting match feature takes social media by storm

DUBAI: An update on Google’s Arts and Culture app is taking social media by storm due to a feature that allows users to match their selfies with fine art portraits from around the world.
Twitter users have flooded the platform with their successful — and sometimes hilarious — face-matches.
The project was launched in collaboration with 17 museums around the world, including London’s Tate Gallery, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and Florence’s Uffizi.
The feature, which launched this week, is still region locked and is not available outside the US — for now.
A Google spokesperson told The Sun newspaper: "This is an experiment that’s only available in parts of the US right now, but we’re glad people are having so much fun matching their selfies to works of art."
However, the inaccessibility has not stopped Twitter users around the world from having a good laugh at the snaps, some of which have proven to be less-than-perfect matches.


French watchdog slaps Google with $57 million fine under new EU law

In this file photo taken on September 2, 2015 The Google logo is displayed at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, California. (AFP)
Updated 20 min 48 sec ago
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French watchdog slaps Google with $57 million fine under new EU law

  • Users have to take too many steps, “sometimes up to 5 or 6 actions,” to find out how and why their data is being used, the commission said

PARIS: France’s data privacy watchdog fined Google 50 million euros ($57 million) on Monday, the first penalty for a US tech giant under new European data privacy rules that took effect last year.
The National Data Protection Commission said it fined the US Internet giant for “lack of transparency, inadequate information and lack of valid consent” regarding ad personalization for users.
It’s one of the biggest regulatory enforcement actions since the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR, came into force in May. The rules are aimed at clarifying individual rights to personal data collected by companies, which are required to use plain language to explain what they’re doing with it.
Even though many tech multinationals like Google are headquartered in the US, they still have to comply with the new rules because they have millions of users in Europe.
The commission said Google users were “not sufficiently informed” about what they were agreeing to as the company collected data for targeted advertisements.
Users have to take too many steps, “sometimes up to 5 or 6 actions,” to find out how and why their data is being used, the commission said. Google’s description of why it’s processing their data is “described in a too generic and vague manner,” it added.
The company’s infringements “deprive the users of essential guarantees regarding processing operations that can reveal important parts of their private life,” the commission said .
The commission acted on complaints by two data protection advocacy groups, NOYB.EU and La Quadrature du Net, filed immediately after GDPR took effect.
Google said in a statement it is “deeply committed” to transparency and user control as well as GDPR consent requirements.
“We’re studying the decision to determine our next steps,” it said.