McDonald’s sets recycling goals for packaging, restaurants

This Monday, April 24, 2017, photo shows a McDonald’s sign and logo at a restaurant in downtown Pittsburgh. (AP)
Updated 16 January 2018
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McDonald’s sets recycling goals for packaging, restaurants

LOS ANGELES: McDonald’s Corp. said on Tuesday it is responding to customers’ No. 1 request by setting goals for switching to environmentally friendly packaging materials and offering recycling in all of its restaurants.
“We have a responsibility to use our scale for good to make changes that will have a meaningful impact across the globe,” said Francesca DeBiase, McDonald’s chief supply chain and sustainability officer.
The world’s biggest restaurant chain will aim to get 100 percent of its packaging from renewable, recycled or certified sources by 2025, with a preference for Forest Stewardship Council certification, which ensures that products come from responsibly managed forests.
Currently, half of McDonald’s customer packaging comes from renewable, recycled or certified sources, and 64 percent of fiber-based packaging comes from certified or recycled sources.
The company will also make recycling available in all of its restaurants by 2025, up from around 10 percent today.
Last week, McDonald’s said it would eliminate foam packaging from its global supply chain by the end of this year.
Recycling infrastructure, regulations and consumer behaviors vary city to city and country to country around the world, said DeBiase. She said that McDonald’s will work with industry experts, local governments and environmental groups to improve packaging designs, create new recycling programs, set progress benchmarks and educate its employees and customers.
“These goals have the potential to be transformational because no other restaurant has the scope and global supply chain of McDonald’s,” said Tom Murray, vice president of corporate partnerships at the Environmental Defense Fund, which is one of McDonald’s partners on the waste reduction and recycling initiative.
Such efforts are good for the environment and for the bottom line, said Murray. “When McDonald’s began their waste reduction efforts nearly 30 years ago, the business and environmental benefits were immediate: the company saved an estimated $6 million a year.”
McDonald’s also has used its large size and global reach to fight the rise of dangerous, antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as “superbugs.”
Scientists and public health experts warn that using medically important antibiotics to prevent disease and speed up growth in healthy animals fuels the development of those potentially deadly bacteria.
In 2015, McDonald’s was the first global fast-food chain to commit to eliminating the use of those drugs from its US chicken supply chain, a move that prompted most of its rivals and most major chicken suppliers to follow suit.


Canada acquires rare book previously owned by Adolf Hitler

Updated 24 January 2019
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Canada acquires rare book previously owned by Adolf Hitler

  • The book details certain cities' population statistics along with organizations and media outlets key at the time to North America's Jewish communities
  • The bookplate bears an eagle, and swastika, and the words "Ex Libris Adolf Hitler," indicating it was part of his personal library

OTTAWA: Library and Archives Canada announced Wednesday it had acquired a rare 1944 book that once belonged to Adolf Hitler.
Written in German, "Statistics, Media, and Organizations of Jewry in the United States and Canada" is a 137-page report produced in 1944 by Heinz Kloss, a famed German linguist who had contact with US Nazi sympathizers.
The book details certain cities' population statistics along with organizations and media outlets key at the time to North America's Jewish communities, Library and Archives Canada said in a statement.
"This work hints at the story of what might have happened in Canada had the Allies lost World War II. It also demonstrates that the Holocaust was not a purely European event, but rather an operation that was stopped before it reached North America," it added.
The bookplate bears an eagle, and swastika, and the words "Ex Libris Adolf Hitler," indicating it was part of his personal library.
"It is fundamental ... to acquire, preserve and make available documents no matter how controversial or contentious they could be," said Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada.
Hitler was an avid reader with a collection reportedly containing 6,000 to 16,000 titles.
Library and Archives Canada said the book was likely brought back to the US as a souvenir of war, as in spring 1945 American soldiers took thousands of books from the Nazi leader's second home near Berchtesgaden, in the German Alps.
The institution added it acquired the book from a reputable Judaica dealer, who obtained it as part of a collection owned by a Holocaust survivor.