McDonald’s sets recycling goals for packaging, restaurants

This Monday, April 24, 2017, photo shows a McDonald’s sign and logo at a restaurant in downtown Pittsburgh. (AP)
Updated 16 January 2018
0

McDonald’s sets recycling goals for packaging, restaurants

LOS ANGELES: McDonald’s Corp. said on Tuesday it is responding to customers’ No. 1 request by setting goals for switching to environmentally friendly packaging materials and offering recycling in all of its restaurants.
“We have a responsibility to use our scale for good to make changes that will have a meaningful impact across the globe,” said Francesca DeBiase, McDonald’s chief supply chain and sustainability officer.
The world’s biggest restaurant chain will aim to get 100 percent of its packaging from renewable, recycled or certified sources by 2025, with a preference for Forest Stewardship Council certification, which ensures that products come from responsibly managed forests.
Currently, half of McDonald’s customer packaging comes from renewable, recycled or certified sources, and 64 percent of fiber-based packaging comes from certified or recycled sources.
The company will also make recycling available in all of its restaurants by 2025, up from around 10 percent today.
Last week, McDonald’s said it would eliminate foam packaging from its global supply chain by the end of this year.
Recycling infrastructure, regulations and consumer behaviors vary city to city and country to country around the world, said DeBiase. She said that McDonald’s will work with industry experts, local governments and environmental groups to improve packaging designs, create new recycling programs, set progress benchmarks and educate its employees and customers.
“These goals have the potential to be transformational because no other restaurant has the scope and global supply chain of McDonald’s,” said Tom Murray, vice president of corporate partnerships at the Environmental Defense Fund, which is one of McDonald’s partners on the waste reduction and recycling initiative.
Such efforts are good for the environment and for the bottom line, said Murray. “When McDonald’s began their waste reduction efforts nearly 30 years ago, the business and environmental benefits were immediate: the company saved an estimated $6 million a year.”
McDonald’s also has used its large size and global reach to fight the rise of dangerous, antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as “superbugs.”
Scientists and public health experts warn that using medically important antibiotics to prevent disease and speed up growth in healthy animals fuels the development of those potentially deadly bacteria.
In 2015, McDonald’s was the first global fast-food chain to commit to eliminating the use of those drugs from its US chicken supply chain, a move that prompted most of its rivals and most major chicken suppliers to follow suit.


Chip Wickham ushers in winds of change on the jazz scene

Updated 22 May 2018
0

Chip Wickham ushers in winds of change on the jazz scene

PARIS: The hotly hyped “British jazz invasion” has been the toast of international scenesters for some months now, with breathy adjective-heavy sprawls penned on both sides of the Atlantic paying tribute to a fresh generation of musos who grew up not in the conservatoires but the clubs, channelling the grit and groove of grime into a distinctly hip, 21st century strain of freewheeling, DIY improvised music.

Now the Arab world has its own outpost in the form of Chip Wickham, a UK-born flautist, saxophonist and producer whose second album grew out of extended stints teaching in the GCC. “Shamal Wind” takes its name from the Gulf’s primal weather patterns, and there’s a distinctly meditative, Middle Eastern vibe to the title track, a slow-burning, moody vamp, peppered with percussive trills, with hints of Yusef Lateef to be found in Wickham’s wandering woodwind musings.

There’s rather less goatee-stroking to be found across the four further up-tempo cuts, which swap soul-searching for soul-jazz, soaked in the breezy bop of a vintage Blue Note release. Recorded over a hot summer in Madrid, a heady Latin pulse drives first single, “Barrio 71” — championed by the likes of Craig Charles — with Spanish multi-percussionist David el Indio steaming up a block party beat framing Wickham’s gutsy workout on baritone sax.

Having previously worked with electronic acts, including Nightmares on Wax and Jimpster, one imagines the dancefloor was a key stimulus behind Wickham’s rhythmically dense, but harmonically spare compositional approach. Phil Wilkinson’s sheer, thumped piano chords drive the relentless nod of second single “Snake Eyes,” Wickham’s raspy flute floating somewhere overhead, readymade to be skimmed off for the anticipated remix market.

In truth, Manchester-raised Wickham is both too thoughtful, and too thoughtless, to truly belong to the London-brewed jazz invasion — Shamal Wind yo-yos between meditative meandering and soulful strutting with a wilful disrespect for trend.