Pakistani religious scholars pass fatwa against terrorism

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Pakistan President Mamnoon Hussain described the fatwa as hugely significant during the release ceremony in Islamabad on Tuesday. (Photo/Press Information Department, Ministry of Information, Pakistan)
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Pakistan President Mamnoon Hussain described the fatwa as hugely significant during the release ceremony in Islamabad on Tuesday. (Photo/Press Information Department, Ministry of Information, Pakistan)
Updated 06 February 2018
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Pakistani religious scholars pass fatwa against terrorism

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s prominent religious scholars have delivered a fatwa in which they unanimously declared all forms of terrorism and suicide attacks un-Islamic.
Their fatwa (decree) was summed up in a document called “Paigham-e-Pakistan” — or “Message from Pakistan” — which was released at a ceremony they attended at the Presidency in the presence of the leading stalwarts of the ruling Pakistan Muslim League (Nawaz) party.
Expressing his confidence in the decree, President Mamnoon Hussain told the audience that the document would be pivotal in countering sectarianism, terrorism, and extremism. He said that the consensus among religious scholars to issue the decree was a monumental step toward progress, adding it would not only present a positive image of the country but also highlight Islam as a religion of peace.
A copy of the 49-page document obtained by Arab News is signed by 1,829 clerics from all Islamic schools of thought in the country. Pakistan’s Foreign Minister Khawaja Asif urged the citizens to accept the decree and support state institutions in their war against terrorism.
Asif said that the government would not allow Pakistani soil to be used for militant training and recruitment or launching attacks against other countries.
“The fatwa, which condemns terrorism and extremism, has also been endorsed by Pakistan’s Ministries of Interior, Foreign Affairs, Education and Religious Affairs,” said President House spokesperson Farooq Adil, adding that it “is also our comprehensive state narrative against terrorism.”
Adil told Arab News that the decree document was drafted on the request of the state. The task was given to the International Islamic University, which not only has religious experts but also communicates with other religious scholars, sects, and civil society. After numerous meetings and deliberations over a span of several months, the decree was unanimously drafted and agreed.
Sharing its salient features, Adil said the fatwa was based on the Constitution of Pakistan, which “is an Islamic constitution that is built upon the Qur’an and the Sunnah.”
Some of the major points of the decree state that the “Constitutions of Pakistan is an Islamic and Democratic document and it is a social contract between all (federating) units of Pakistan, which enjoys the support of (Islamic) scholars of all schools of thought.”
The document adds that “in accordance with the requirements of the Constitution of the Islamic Republic, there is nothing in Pakistan which is contrary to the Qur’an and the Sunnah and no individual or group has the right to start any sort of armed struggle against the state of Pakistan and its institutions in the presence of this constitution.”
The document also condemns the groups who use force in the name of implementing Shariah, saying their acts are repugnant to the basic teachings of Islam. “Moreover, revolt against the Constitution of Pakistan and imposing one’s own ideology on others with force is contrary to the injunctions of Shariah and is thus riot on earth. This is also a national crime according to the constitution and laws of the Islamic Republic. In order to put an end to such destructive activities, comprehensive administrative, educational, ideological and defense measures will be taken.”
Paigham-e-Pakistan also maintains that “there is a need for modern establishment of Pakistani society in line with the requirements of the Constitution of Pakistan, which eradicates the tendencies of hate, narrow-mindedness and intolerance.”
“We have seen many fatwas in the past, but this is a comprehensive one and has covered all issues in an effective manner,” said Qari Mohammed Hanif Jalandhri, secretary-general of the largest federation of Islamic seminaries, Wafaqul Madaris Al-Arabia, while speaking with Arab News.
The decree may not be enough to stop terrorists acting as “soldiers of Islam,” but it would prevent misinterpretation of the religion, said Dr. Yaseen Zafar of the Salafi Madrasa Board.
“We wanted to send out a clear message that all religious scholars are against extremism and terrorism. Hopefully, this will also deoxygenate militant networks and gradually make them irrelevant,” Zafar told Arab News.
Former Chairman of the Madrasa Education Board of Pakistan Dr. Amir Tauseen agreed that it was important to issue a fatwa with consensus. However, he added that what was more important was its implementation.


Mugabe a no-show at Zimbabwe parliament hearing

Updated 6 min 2 sec ago
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Mugabe a no-show at Zimbabwe parliament hearing

HARARE: Former Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe on Wednesday failed to turn up for a parliamentary hearing where he was due to give evidence on corruption in the diamond mining industry.
The 94-year-old, who is in frail health, had been summoned to a session at 9:00am, but when he did not show up, lawmakers rescheduled the session for Monday.
Committee head Temba Mliswa, an independent lawmaker, told reporters that the parliamentary committee was “cognizant of the fact that 9:00 am was a bit too early” for the former president to show up.
He said the Monday session had been set for 2:00 pm, although no-one in Mugabe’s office would say whether or not he would attend.
Lawmakers want to question him over his 2016 claim that Zimbabwe lost $15 billion in revenue due to corruption and foreign exploitation in the diamond sector.
“We are not here to humiliate him, we expect him to have enough time to prepare. So on Monday at 2:00 p.m. we expect him here,” Mliswa said, although he admitted that Mugabe was not legally obliged to attend.
Mugabe ruled Zimbabwe from 1980 until he was ousted from office in November following a brief military takeover. He denounced his ouster as a coup and has not been seen in public since.
His authoritarian regime has been accused of syphoning off diamond profits.
He was replaced by his former deputy Emmerson Mnangagwa, a veteran loyalist in the ruling ZANU-PF party who was backed by senior military officers.
Zimbabwe discovered alluvial diamonds in Chiadzwa, in the east of the country, more than 10 years ago.
Rights groups have accused security forces of using brutal methods to control the scattered deposits.
The parliamentary committee has already interviewed former ministers, police and intelligence chiefs about the mining industry in Chiadzwa.
Zimbabwe has allowed several diamond companies to mine the area — most of them as joint ventures between the government and Chinese firms. But there have been widespread allegations of mass looting.
In July, Zimbabwe is to hold elections, the first since Mugabe was unseated, with ZANU-PF widely predicted to retain power.
Mnangagwa has vowed to hold a fair and free vote and has pledged to revive the moribund economy by repairing international ties and attracting foreign investment.