Hollywood producers issue anti-harassment guidelines

In this March 2, 2014 file photo, Harvey Weinstein arrives at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. The Producers Guild of America has ratified guidelines for combating sexual harassment in the entertainment industry. (AP)
Updated 20 January 2018
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Hollywood producers issue anti-harassment guidelines

LOS ANGELES: Hollywood producers on Friday outlined steps aimed at preventing sexual harassment on and off television and movie sets in a response to revelations of misconduct that have shaken the entertainment industry in recent months.
The voluntary guidelines from the Producers Guild of America (PGA) recommend that all productions provide in-person anti-sexual harassment training for all cast and crew before the start of each season.
They also urge producers to conduct meetings and casting sessions in a “professional, safe and comfortable” environment, among other steps.
“As producers, we provide key leadership in creating and sustaining work environments built on mutual respect, so it is our obligation to change our culture and eradicate this abuse,” PGA Co-Presidents Gary Lucchesi and Lori McCreary said in a statement.
The guidelines are initial recommendations from a task force the PGA created in October after allegations of misconduct against entertainment industry figures including producer Harvey Weinstein, who has been accused by more than 70 women of sexual misconduct, including rape.
Many of the accusations against Weinstein stemmed from actresses who said they were sent to meetings with him alone in hotel rooms. Weinstein has denied having non-consensual sex with anyone.
The PGA expelled Weinstein from the group in October.
The new guidelines are especially important for independent productions that are not being done at a movie or TV studio with a human resources department, McCreary said in an interview.
Lucchesi said the steps, which were unanimously ratified by the PGA’s board of directors, are meant to serve as “best practices” for the PGA’s 8,200 members.
“It’s really about setting the right tone and having the proper behavior,” he said. “You don’t want people to be insensitive anymore.”
The recommendations also offer advice to victims of harassment, starting with going to authorities if they believe a crime was committed, and taking notes shortly after an incident.


Japan’s ‘Uncle Olympics’ fan dies just short of 2020 Games

Naotoshi Yamada, above, was planning to attend the Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo in 2020. (Reuters/File)
Updated 18 March 2019
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Japan’s ‘Uncle Olympics’ fan dies just short of 2020 Games

  • The man attended all summer games since 1964
  • He often wore a golden hat when he attended the games

TOKYO: A Japanese Olympic mega-fan who attended every summer games since Tokyo in 1964 has died, just over a year before his home city was to host its second Olympics.
Tokyo businessman Naotoshi Yamada, 92, who died on March 9 from heart failure, was a national celebrity in his own right with his repeated, gleeful appearances in Olympic stands.
“Uncle Olympics,” as he came to be known, was an omnipresent fixture for Japanese TV watchers cheering on the Japan team at the “Greatest Show On Earth.”
Often sporting a gold top hat, kimono, and a beaming smile, Yamada also became a darling of the international media.
“After 92 years of his life spent cheering, Naotoshi Yamada, international Olympic cheerleader, was called to eternal rest on March 9, 2019,” said his web site, managed by a firm he founded.
Born in 1926, Yamada built a successful wire rope manufacturing business, and also expanded his portfolio to include the hotel and real estate sectors.
But away from work, his passion was for sport, particularly the Olympics.
He did not miss a summer games since 1964, taking in Mexico City, Munich, Montreal, Moscow, Los Angeles, Seoul, Barcelona, Atlanta, Sydney, Athens, Beijing, London and Rio de Janeiro.
For good measure, he also attended the winter games when it rolled into Nagano in 1998, and told local media of his strong desire to attend the 2020 Tokyo Games.
Yamada saw the first Tokyo Olympics when he was 38.
But his passion was truly ignited during the 1968 Mexico City Games, according to his website.
He donned a kimono and a sombrero hat and loudly cheered for a Mexican 5000-meter runner, mistaking him for a Japanese athlete.
Local spectators embraced the scene and loudly cheered for Japanese athletes in return, leading to an electrifying show of support that went beyond nationality, his website said.
“He saw the awesome power of cheering, and was mesmerised by it ever since,” it said.