Macron shares African outrage on Trump’s vulgar language

In this Monday file photo, French president Emmanuel Macron delivers his speech during a ceremony at The Cour de Cassation, France's highest judicial court, at the Paris courthouse, in Paris. Macron told the BBC in an interview broadcast Sunday he shared the outrage of many African countries in response to President Donald Trump's disparaging comments about the continent. (AP)
Updated 21 January 2018
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Macron shares African outrage on Trump’s vulgar language

LONDON: French President Emmanuel Macron says he shares the outrage over President Donald Trump’s disparaging comment about Africa, arguing that such language hurts efforts to bring peace and development to the continent.
Macron told the BBC’s Andrew Marr program in an interview broadcast Sunday that the words attributed to Trump — “shithole countries” — were inappropriate. His expression of solidarity came after Marr asked the French president whether he shared the outrage of African nations that were offended by the comment.
“For sure,” Macron said. “It’s not a word you can use. And if we want, precisely, to build peace, development in these countries and a respectful relationship,” you can’t use those words “by definition.”
“And I think a lot of our issues in both the Middle East and Africa are due to a lot of frustrations, due to a lot of past humiliations and we have to understand that.” Macron continued. “And I do believe we have to respect all the countries. That’s what we owe them, and that’s much more efficient.”
Trump referred to African nations as “shithole countries” during a White House meeting on immigration this month, according to several participants. The president denied saying those words, though he acknowledged using tough language.
In the BBC interview, Macron went on to say that he has a “very strong” relationship with Trump, noting that the billionaire US leader is not a “classical politician.” He said he disagrees with Trump on some issues, but wants to work with Washington.
For example, the two countries must work together to force North Korea to return to the negotiating table over its nuclear arms program, Macron said. He was less conciliatory on the Paris climate change treaty, saying the more than 180 countries that agreed to the deal will not renegotiate it to satisfy the US.
“I call him very regularly,” Macron said of Trump. “I’m always extremely direct and frank, as he is. Sometimes I manage to convince him, sometimes I fail.”


Migrants need better access to health care in Europe: WHO

Updated 21 January 2019
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Migrants need better access to health care in Europe: WHO

  • In WHO’s Europe region, which covers 53 countries, migrants represent almost 10% of the population, or 90.7 million of 920 million inhabitants
  • In 15 European countries, such as Austria, Turkey and Britain, asylum seekers have access to the same care as the local population

COPENHAGEN: Europe must guarantee migrants better access to health care, the World Health Organization urged Monday in its first report on the health of new arrivals to the old continent, where accessibility varies broadly.
“The most important is the access to health services. To improve their health, it is important to fill the gap for access to basic care,” Santino Severoni, the head of the WHO’s Migration and Health Programme, told AFP.
In WHO’s Europe region, which covers 53 countries, migrants represent almost 10 percent of the population, or 90.7 million of 920 million inhabitants.
But the proportion of migrants varies widely from country to country, accounting for 45 percent of Malta’s population to just two percent in Albania.
Depending on the country and migrant status, they may enjoy full access to the health care system or none at all.
In 15 European countries, such as Austria, Turkey and Britain, asylum seekers have access to the same care as the local population, whereas in Germany and Hungary they are only entitled to emergency care.
“People, and some governments, have been reacting emotionally when it comes to newcomers because of the lack of information and data,” Severoni said.
Contrary to what some may believe, “there is a very low risk ... of transmitting communicable disease from the refugee and migrant population to the host population,” he said.
For example, a large share of HIV-positive migrants contract the disease after arriving in Europe.
In addition, new arrivals are more likely to develop chronic illnesses as a result of their new lifestyle — such as less physical activity and too much fast food — and the poverty conditions some encounter.
While they are at lower risk of developing cancer than local populations — with the exception of cervical cancer — cancer tends to be diagnosed at a later stage, which makes the prognosis less certain.
Migrants’ children are meanwhile at greater risk of being overweight and having psychological problems than children in their host country, the report noted.