Macron shares African outrage on Trump’s vulgar language

In this Monday file photo, French president Emmanuel Macron delivers his speech during a ceremony at The Cour de Cassation, France's highest judicial court, at the Paris courthouse, in Paris. Macron told the BBC in an interview broadcast Sunday he shared the outrage of many African countries in response to President Donald Trump's disparaging comments about the continent. (AP)
Updated 21 January 2018
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Macron shares African outrage on Trump’s vulgar language

LONDON: French President Emmanuel Macron says he shares the outrage over President Donald Trump’s disparaging comment about Africa, arguing that such language hurts efforts to bring peace and development to the continent.
Macron told the BBC’s Andrew Marr program in an interview broadcast Sunday that the words attributed to Trump — “shithole countries” — were inappropriate. His expression of solidarity came after Marr asked the French president whether he shared the outrage of African nations that were offended by the comment.
“For sure,” Macron said. “It’s not a word you can use. And if we want, precisely, to build peace, development in these countries and a respectful relationship,” you can’t use those words “by definition.”
“And I think a lot of our issues in both the Middle East and Africa are due to a lot of frustrations, due to a lot of past humiliations and we have to understand that.” Macron continued. “And I do believe we have to respect all the countries. That’s what we owe them, and that’s much more efficient.”
Trump referred to African nations as “shithole countries” during a White House meeting on immigration this month, according to several participants. The president denied saying those words, though he acknowledged using tough language.
In the BBC interview, Macron went on to say that he has a “very strong” relationship with Trump, noting that the billionaire US leader is not a “classical politician.” He said he disagrees with Trump on some issues, but wants to work with Washington.
For example, the two countries must work together to force North Korea to return to the negotiating table over its nuclear arms program, Macron said. He was less conciliatory on the Paris climate change treaty, saying the more than 180 countries that agreed to the deal will not renegotiate it to satisfy the US.
“I call him very regularly,” Macron said of Trump. “I’m always extremely direct and frank, as he is. Sometimes I manage to convince him, sometimes I fail.”


Kremlin says world ‘more dangerous’ if US drops nuclear treaty

Updated 33 min 34 sec ago
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Kremlin says world ‘more dangerous’ if US drops nuclear treaty

  • ‘Russia has been and remains committed to the provisions of this treaty’
  • The treaty was signed by then US president Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev

RUSSIA: The Kremlin on Monday said the world would be less safe if Washington goes ahead with plans to withdraw from a Cold War-era nuclear weapons treaty that banned intermediate-range missiles.
“Such steps, if taken, will make the world more dangerous,” said presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov as he rejected claims by US President Donald Trump that Russia had violated the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF).
“Russia has been and remains committed to the provisions of this treaty,” he said.
The US had previously undermined the foundations of the agreement, Peskov added.
“The intention to withdraw from this document is of the deepest concern.”
Peskov reiterated an earlier statement by President Vladimir Putin that Russia would never strike first even if threatened with a nuclear attack.
“We don’t feel that we have the right to inflict the first strike,” he said.
The INF resolved a crisis over Soviet nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles targeting Western capitals.
The treaty was signed by then US president Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev, the last Soviet leader, who at the weekend also criticized plans to pull out.
US national security adviser John Bolton is in Moscow for two days of talks in which the issue will be discussed.