Macron shares African outrage on Trump’s vulgar language

In this Monday file photo, French president Emmanuel Macron delivers his speech during a ceremony at The Cour de Cassation, France's highest judicial court, at the Paris courthouse, in Paris. Macron told the BBC in an interview broadcast Sunday he shared the outrage of many African countries in response to President Donald Trump's disparaging comments about the continent. (AP)
Updated 21 January 2018
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Macron shares African outrage on Trump’s vulgar language

LONDON: French President Emmanuel Macron says he shares the outrage over President Donald Trump’s disparaging comment about Africa, arguing that such language hurts efforts to bring peace and development to the continent.
Macron told the BBC’s Andrew Marr program in an interview broadcast Sunday that the words attributed to Trump — “shithole countries” — were inappropriate. His expression of solidarity came after Marr asked the French president whether he shared the outrage of African nations that were offended by the comment.
“For sure,” Macron said. “It’s not a word you can use. And if we want, precisely, to build peace, development in these countries and a respectful relationship,” you can’t use those words “by definition.”
“And I think a lot of our issues in both the Middle East and Africa are due to a lot of frustrations, due to a lot of past humiliations and we have to understand that.” Macron continued. “And I do believe we have to respect all the countries. That’s what we owe them, and that’s much more efficient.”
Trump referred to African nations as “shithole countries” during a White House meeting on immigration this month, according to several participants. The president denied saying those words, though he acknowledged using tough language.
In the BBC interview, Macron went on to say that he has a “very strong” relationship with Trump, noting that the billionaire US leader is not a “classical politician.” He said he disagrees with Trump on some issues, but wants to work with Washington.
For example, the two countries must work together to force North Korea to return to the negotiating table over its nuclear arms program, Macron said. He was less conciliatory on the Paris climate change treaty, saying the more than 180 countries that agreed to the deal will not renegotiate it to satisfy the US.
“I call him very regularly,” Macron said of Trump. “I’m always extremely direct and frank, as he is. Sometimes I manage to convince him, sometimes I fail.”


Cape Verde opens investigation after migrant boat sails to Brazil

Updated 5 min 16 sec ago
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Cape Verde opens investigation after migrant boat sails to Brazil

  • Foreign Affairs Minister Luis Filipe: “There were no Cape Verdeans on board but because the ship began its crossing in Cape Verde we are going to investigate so that other cases do not occur.”
  • There were 25 migrants — all men — on the boat and two Brazilians, reportedly suspected of being people traffickers.

PRAIA: Cape Verde has opened an investigation after 25 African migrants were found off the coast of Brazil after reportedly spending five weeks at sea.
The country’s Foreign Affairs Minister Luis Filipe said the migrant boat started its great journey in the west African archipelago.
“There were no Cape Verdeans on board but because the ship began its crossing in Cape Verde we are going to investigate so that other cases do not occur,” Filipe Tavaras said on TV Wednesday night.
On Saturday, local fishermen found the catamaran, flying the Haitian flag, drifting off the Brazilian coastal town of Sao Jose de Ribamar, south of the Amazon river, the Brazilian navy said.
There were 25 migrants — all men — on the boat and two Brazilians, reportedly suspected of being people traffickers.
The migrants came from Guinea, Nigeria and Senegal on the other side of the Atlantic, the human rights department for Brazil’s state of Maranhao said in a statement.
They had reportedly spent 35 days afloat but there was no immediate indication of what route they had taken.
Brazilian police will investigate possible crimes committed against the migrants and evaluate their legal situation.
Cape Verde, a group of nine inhabited volcanic islands, lies some 500 kilometers (300 miles) off the west African countries of Guinea-Bissau and Senegal.
The islands gained independence from Portugal in 1975, after an 11-year liberation war.