Pakistani filmmaker eyes Saudi Arabia for future projects

From left, Prince Abdul Aziz bin Matab Al-Saud, chief of the Top Events Co. and Knowledge Core, with Pakistani filmmaker Imran Raza Kazmi at the premier of a Pakistani movie held in Riyadh on Saturday. (AN photo)
Updated 03 February 2018
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Pakistani filmmaker eyes Saudi Arabia for future projects

RIYADH: In a bid to promote Saudi-Pakistani relations in the film and entertainment industry, the premiere showing of the Pakistani movie “Parchi” was organized at a makeshift cinema hall here on Saturday night.
Guests from the film fraternity of the two countries and diplomats attended the event.
Prince Abdul Aziz bin Matab Al-Saud, chief of Top Events, welcomed the producer of the Pakistani flick, Imran Raza Kazmi, and other guests.
Kazmi said: “The show brought together film industry leaders of the two countries, paving the way for a possible production of Pakistani films and dramas in Saudi Arabia.”
Kazmi, who specially flew to Riyadh to attend the premiere show, also announced plans to work closely with the Top Events and the General Entertainment Authority (GEA).
“We are already talking to the GEA on cooperation modules in film, drama and entertainment sectors,” said Imran Ismael of Top Events.
Asked about the prospects of cooperation in the film and entertainment sector, Kazmi said he plans to visit the Kingdom with a group of filmmakers and artists to talk to the Saudi agencies for collaboration and to identify shooting locations across the Kingdom later this year.
“I am overwhelmed with the love and support given by Saudi brothers and Pakistani expatriates during this trip,” he added.
Malik Nadeem Sher, Riyadh-based bureau chief of a Pakistani TV channel, said: “I was really thrilled to watch the film with the producer of the film present at the show in Riyadh.” “It was really unbelievable…to watch the film, like I’m watching in a theater in Pakistan,” said Ghaffar Ahmed, who attended the first of the six shows.


126,000 pilgrims from Bangladesh will perform Hajj 2018

Bangladeshi Hajj pilgrims arrive at Jeddah airport. (AFP)
Updated 17 August 2018
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126,000 pilgrims from Bangladesh will perform Hajj 2018

  • Bangladeshi pilgrims were in a good condition and everything, from accommodation to treatment, was going well

DHAKA: The last Hajj flights from Bangladesh will leave for Saudi Arabia this morning.
About 125,000 Bangladeshi pilgrims have already reached the holy city Makkah, on special flights operated by Biman Bangladesh Airlines and Saudi Arabian Airlines
(Saudia).
The two operators will take the last batch of 1,400 pilgrims from Hazarat Shahjalal International Airport in Dhaka, after which the Hajj flights will be closed until Aug. 27.
The Bangladesh government has made extensive efforts to cooperate with the Kingdom in arranging travel plans for pilgrims, said officials in Dhaka.
“Our Ministry of Religious Affairs is highly concerned about the well-being of the pilgrims,” Saiful Islam, director of the Hajj Office in Dhaka, told Arab News.
“About 250 Bangladesh officials, including the staff of the Bangladesh mission in Saudi Arabia, have been deployed at places that the pilgrims will visit while performing the rituals of Hajj,” he told Arab News.
Most of the staff of the Religious Affairs Ministry have been sent to Saudi Arabia to assist Bangladeshi pilgrims and provide them with emergency support, Islam said.
“Three medical camps have been established in Jeddah, Makkah and Madinah with 30 doctors and nurses to cater to pilgrims’ medical needs. In case of emergency, arrangements have been made to move a pilgrim in critical condition to specialized local hospitals,” he added.
“This year, so far, everything is under control and running very smoothly,” said M. Shahadat Hossain Taslim, secretary-general of the Hajj Agencies Association of Banglaesh (HAAB).
Speaking to Arab News from Makkah, Taslim expressed his gratitude to the Hajj Ministry of Saudi Arabia for its “better Hajj management this year.”
“Last year, many Bangladeshi pilgrims faced difficulty due to lack of transport in Mina, Arafat and Muzdalifah,” he said. “But this year, we have addressed the issue well ahead of time and are not facing any problem in this regard.”
Bangladeshi pilgrims were in a good condition and everything, from accommodation to treatment, was going well, he added.
A total of 126,000 pilgrims from Bangladesh will perform Hajj this year.
The Hajj flights from Bangladesh to Saudi Arabia will be closed after Friday and resume on Aug. 27 to bring the pilgrims back home.