‘Jumanji’ continues to stomp North American box office competition

This file image released by Sony Pictures shows Kevin Hart, from left, Dwayne Johnson, Karen Gillan and Jack Black in “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle.” (AP)
Updated 22 January 2018
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‘Jumanji’ continues to stomp North American box office competition

LOS ANGELES: Sony’s family film “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” continued to stomp the competition at the North American box office, taking the top spot for the third straight week, according to industry estimates Sunday.
“Jumanji,” starring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson along with funnymen Jack Black and Kevin Hart, netted just over $20 million for the three-day weekend, bringing its total to $317 million in its fifth week out, industry tracker Exhibitor Relations reported.
The film follows four teens who find themselves transported inside the video game world of Jumanji.
Debuting in second place was “12 Strong” from Warner Bros., starring Chris Hemsworth, about US Special Forces deployed to Afghanistan after the September 11, 2001 attacks. It had a take of $16.5 million.
Gritty heist thriller “Den of Thieves” from STX Films was third on the list in its debut weekend, with $15.3 million. The movie, starring Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson and Gerard Butler, follows the intersecting lives of the major crimes unit of the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department and an elite band of robbers.
Fox’s “The Post” dropped to fourth place from second, after pulling in $12.2 million over the weekend for a total take of $45.2 million in four weeks.
The political thriller recounts the nail-biting behind-the-scenes story of the 1971 publication by the Washington Post of the Pentagon Papers, which exposed the lies behind US involvement in the Vietnam War.
“The Greatest Showman,” a Fox film about larger-than-life circus impresario P.T. Barnum, netted $11 million to take the fifth spot. It has taken in $113.5 million in five weeks.
Rounding out the top 10 were:
“Paddington 2” ($8.2 million)
“The Commuter” ($6.7 million)
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi” ($6.6 million)
“Insidious: The Last Key” ($5.9 million)
“Forever My Girl” ($4.7 million)


King Abdul Aziz Foundation archives around 6,000 interviews with Saudis

Researching and recording oral histories can give a sense of cultural value. (Photo/Social media)
Updated 22 October 2018
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King Abdul Aziz Foundation archives around 6,000 interviews with Saudis

  • Darah assigned a number of specialized teams to carry out visits to the Kingdom’s different regions

RIYADH: The Oral History Center of the King Abdul Aziz Foundation for Research and Archives (Darah) has archived around 6,000 interviews with Saudi nationals past and present, said the Saudi Press Agency.
The Saudi Oral History Center was established in 1997. It was the third of its kind in the world, after the United States and Britain.
Darah hosts millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts and is considered the main source of Saudi national history inside the Kingdom, and abroad through the Oral History Center.
Darah assigned a number of specialized teams to carry out visits to the Kingdom’s different regions, speak to citizens about their histories, study sources of national history, and document the accounts of those who directly or indirectly contributed to the Kingdom’s history.
It conducted audio-visual interviews with many contemporaries and witnesses, and transcribed them, and investigated those stories based on scientific and technical protocols. It did this in cooperation with universities and international centers specializing in oral history, and with national and regional institutions interested in oral history and heritage.
Darah sees oral history — a precise account from eyewitnesses, or reported contemporary accounts — as an important resource. Many Western countries place great emphasis on oral histories and have established specialized centers to record and preserve such accounts.
The Foundation also considers oral histories a useful tool that can fill gaps left in recorded history, especially regarding personal histories of families.
Researching and recording oral histories can also provide the elderly with a sense of value and bring generations closer together.