Hijab-wearing blogger says she is stepping down from L’Oreal campaign

Amena Khan, who earlier this month became the first woman wearing a headscarf to feature in a major mainstream hair campaign for L’Oreal, appears to have stepped down. (L'Oreal)
Updated 22 January 2018
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Hijab-wearing blogger says she is stepping down from L’Oreal campaign

LONDON: Amena Khan, who earlier this month became the first woman wearing a headscarf to feature in a major mainstream hair campaign for L’Oreal, appears to have stepped down from her role in the campaign due to anti-Israel tweets she made in 2014 during the Israel-Gaza conflict.
Taking to Instagram on Monday, the British beauty blogger said: “I deeply regret the content of the tweets I made in 2014, and sincerely apologize for the upset and hurt they have caused.
“Championing diversity is one of my passions, I don’t discriminate against anyone. I have chosen to delete them as they do not represent the message of harmony I stand for.”
Making a reference to the L’Oreal campaign, she added: “I recently took part in a campaign, which excited me because it celebrated inclusivity.
“With deep regret, I’ve decided to step down from this campaign because the current conversations surrounding it detract from the positive and inclusive sentiment it set out to deliver.”

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Khan has since deleted the anti-Israel tweets she made during the 2014 conflict, but a screenshot shows them below:

In the campaign promo video, Khan wears a pink outfit with matching headscarf. Speaking to Vogue UK about the message of the promo, she pointed out that even though she does not show her hair in public, she spends most of her time at home or with family without a headscarf. She explained that hair care is important, whether it is seen or not.
The new ad for L’Oreal’s hair-care product line, Elvive, features a diverse cast of women and men with different hairstyles and the French cosmetics company has joined brands such as Nike and CoverGirl, who have also featured Muslim women in recent ad campaigns.


Pair of Japanese premium melons sell for record $29,300

Updated 26 May 2018
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Pair of Japanese premium melons sell for record $29,300

  • Yubari melons are considered a status symbol in Japan with many being bought as a gift for friends and colleagues.
  • Ordinary fruit is comparatively expensive in Japan and it is not unusual for a single apple to cost as much as $3.

TOKYO: A single pair of premium melons on Saturday fetched a record 3.2 million yen ($29,300) at auction in Japan, where the fruit is regarded as a status symbol.
Seasonal fruit offerings in Japan routinely attract massive sums from buyers seeking social prestige, or from shop owners wanting to attract customers to “ooh and aah” over the extravagant edibles.
The winning bid was placed by a local fruit packing firm for the first Yubari melons to go under the hammer this year at the Sapporo Central Wholesale Market in northern Hokkaido, officials said.
The figure — enough to buy a new car in Japan — topped the previous record for the luxury fruit, which fetched 3.0 million yen two years ago.
“Yubari melons are growing well this year as sunshine hours have been long since early May,” said market official Tatsuro Shibuta.
Yubari melons are considered a status symbol in Japan — like a fine wine — with many being bought as a gift for friends and colleagues.
The best-quality Yubari melons are perfect spheres with a smooth, evenly patterned rind. A T-shaped stalk is left on the fruit, which is usually sold in an ornate box.
Even ordinary fruit is comparatively expensive in Japan and it is not unusual for a single apple to cost as much as $3.