Drake & Scull to build massive worker camp in UAE

Drake & Scull is developing a large construction workers camp in the UAE as it emerges from a major corporate restructuring. (Photo courtesy of DSI)
Updated 22 January 2018
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Drake & Scull to build massive worker camp in UAE

LONDON: Drake & Scull, a UAE-based construction firm, is to build a new worker camp in Dubai to help it deliver existing and anticipated new projects in the country.

The camp will accommodate 5,000 workers, adding to approximately 12,000 laborers already employed by the construction firm. The group is currently on a recruitment drive to bolster its workforce.

It follows last year’s completed debt restructuring which has released new credit to support the company’s pipeline of projects, according to the company.

“DSI is now well-positioned for a new phase of recovery and growth after successfully addressing major operational and financial challenges last year,” said Rabih Abou Diwan, investor relations director, Drake & Scull International.

“Led by a new visionary leadership team and backed by Tabarak Investment, the company is undertaking several measures to improve its operational capabilities,” he said.


‘Saudi Inc’ author says no shows won’t dent KSA investment appeal

Updated 23 October 2018
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‘Saudi Inc’ author says no shows won’t dent KSA investment appeal

  • Ellen Wald said there was an element of symbolism in the decision by some executives not to attend the Future Investment Initiative
  • Wald also said that the absence of many big name investors from the US and Europe might hand an advantage to other potential business partners

RIYADH: An American expert on US-Saudi business affairs believes that the withdrawal of some senior business leaders from the investment conference that opens in Riyadh today does not reflect the Kingdom’s commercial attractions.
Ellen Wald, president of the Transversal Consulting think-tank and author of the recent book “Saudi Inc,” told Arab News that there was an element of symbolism in the decision by some executives not to attend the Future Investment Initiative in the Saudi capital, and that many business people were still looking to do business there.
“I think the big pull out of CEOs is not really reflective of the corporate interest in the Kingdom because we see them sending their next level of executives along. So to some degree it (the CEO pullout) is symbolic. I think what they experience here this week will have an effect,” she said.
Wald also said that the absence of many big name investors from the US and Europe might hand an advantage to potential business partners in other parts of the world.
“In terms of attracting foreign investment, Saudi Arabia could have strategic leverage with Russia and China, and a unique opportunity to work on cutting edge technolgies,” she said.
Wald was speaking at an event organized by the King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center to discuss her book. She said that Saudi Arabia had a greater need for technology and know-how than for cash investment.
“With regard to foreign investment, it is not about extracting money, but about extracting expertise. The Saudi model has been to hire outside industrial talent, for example the Public Investment Fund and its cinema partner AMC. They are buying expertise in the same way that the Saudis bought in expertise with Aramco, all those years ago. Eventually they (PIF) will buy the cinemas out or bring in somebody else to run them,” she added.