64-year-old Iraqi arrested in Philippines accused of Hamas ties

Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronaldo Dela Rosa presents to media the arrested Iraqi national, Taha Mohamed Al-Jabouri. (Photo courtesy: PNP)
Updated 23 January 2018
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64-year-old Iraqi arrested in Philippines accused of Hamas ties

MANILA: Philippine intelligence operatives have arrested a 64-year-old Iraqi national and accused him of having links with the Palestinian organization Hamas.
Taha Mohammed Al-Jabouri was presented to the media by Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Ronaldo Dela Rosa on Monday. He was arrested at the weekend by PNP Intelligence Group operatives in Barangay Malabanias, Angeles City.
Citing intelligence information passed to the PNP by the Iraqi Embassy in Manila, Dela Rosa claimed Al-Jabouri is “a chemist with knowledge of explosives who is known to have close ties with militant extremist movements in the Middle East.”
According to the PNP chief, Al-Jabouri arrived in Manila from Istanbul on Aug. 27, at the height of preparations for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit, which was held in November and was attended by 20 world leaders, including US President Donald Trump.
“Since then he evaded detection after the Iraqi Embassy in Manila alerted the Philippine intelligence community of his presence,” Dela Rosa said.
On Saturday night police were tipped off by local authorities in Angeles City of the presence of a suspicious-looking man with Middle Eastern features, fitting the description and photographs provided by the Iraqi Embassy. PNP intelligence operatives were immediately sent to the area and at around 3 a.m. on Sunday they arrested Al-Jabouri.
The police claim Al-Jabouri admitted, under interrogation, that he had served as a consultant for Hamas in Damascus before moving to Istanbul in 2012. He also claimed to have been responsible for improving Hamas’ “rocket technology.”
The suspect further revealed that he traveled to Manila to meet a Chinese business group, which hired him as a consultant.
However, Dela Rosa said the police have yet to establish whether Al-Jabouri has been involved in any illegal activity in the Philippines, or the threat the suspect may pose. They are, he said, checking if Al-Jabouri has links with any local militant groups.
At present, charges will be filed against the Iraqi national as an illegal alien, as his 90-day visa has already expired. Philippine authorities are coordinating with the Iraqi Embassy to deport Al-Jabouri.
Dr. Rikard Jalkebro, a visiting security expert from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, said the arrest shows that the Philippines, and other countries in Southeast Asia, are a common choice for people who are trying to escape justice in their home countries.
Jalkebro, however, questioned the wisdom of making Al-Jabouri’s arrest public, and other aspects of the affair.
The biggest question, he said, is: “What is the Iraqi government, or the Iraqi Embassy’s underlying reason for reporting Al-Jabouri?”
He continued, “I’m not sure of the point of alerting the media about this arrest. I think that might have been a bit preemptive. (It seems they are) highlighting the fact that he has links to Hamas and that he is Iraqi in order to, not necessarily spread fear, but to spread some kind of caution and highlight that yes, we do have foreign terrorists in the country.”
“I think it sounds very odd to mention that you freelance for Hamas. That doesn’t add up to me,” he told Arab News. “It sounds like a reason for the government to say, ‘Look at this. We have a foreign terrorist.’”


Venezuela’s Maduro to throw concert rivaling Richard Branson

Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro and his wife Cilia Flores, attend a meeting with supporters in Caracas, Venezuela January 22, 2019. (REUTERS)
Updated 5 min 19 sec ago
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Venezuela’s Maduro to throw concert rivaling Richard Branson

  • Maduro’s government has been providing people with deeply discounted boxes of cooking oil, flour and other items, while coming under accusations it is using food as a political tool

CARACAS, Venezuela: President Nicolas Maduro’s government barely missed a beat Monday in announcing plans for its own huge concert to rival one being organized by a billionaire backer of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido.
Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said the government will throw a concert Saturday and Sunday on Venezuela’s side of the border — opposite one in Colombia being spearheaded by Richard Branson, a British adventurer and founder of the Virgin Group.
Rodriguez did not announce the artists who are expected to perform, saying only that the concert would be massive.
“People from all over the world want to take part in this message of love, solidarity and denunciation against the aggression that they’re trying against the Venezuelan people,” Rodriguez said.
Branson told The Associated Press that he hopes the concert he is throwing will save lives by raising money for “much-needed medical help” for crisis-torn Venezuela, which is suffering from hyperinflation and widespread shortages of food and medicine.
He said he is aiming to raise $100 million for suffering Venezuelans and open the borders to emergency aid. Up to 300,000 people are expected to attend Friday’s concert featuring Spanish-French singer Manu Chao, Mexican band Mana, Spanish singer-songwriter Alejandro Sanz and Dominican artist Juan Luis Guerra.
Branson said that it is not funded by any government and that all the artists are performing for free. The plan is to raise donations from viewers watching the concert on a livestream over the Internet.
“Venezuela sadly has not become the utopia that the current administration of Venezuela or the past administration were hoping for, and that has resulted in a lot of people literally dying from lack of medical help,” Branson said in a telephone interview from Necker, his private island in the British Virgin Islands. “I think it will draw attention to the problem on a global basis.”
The concert is being held in Cucuta, a Colombian border city of some 700,000 people that has been swollen by hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans who have fled hardships in their homeland. The city is the staging point for foreign humanitarian aid — much of it from the US government — that is being blocked from entering Venezuela by Maduro’s socialist administration.
Branson said he hopes that Venezuela’s armed forces, until now loyal to Maduro, will allow the aid to reach Venezuelans.
“We want to make it a joyous occasion,” Branson said in his first interview since he announced the concert on a brief video posted online last week. “And we’re hoping that sense prevails and that the military allows the bridge to be open so that much-needed supplies can be sent across.”
He said he opposes trying to carry the aid in by force, but clearly favors Guaido in his standoff with Maduro.
“I don’t personally feel that force should be used at all by either side,” he said.
“If they (Venezuelan troops) stop the aid coming through and there are pictures of hundreds of thousands of people wanting to come through from both sides, that will send out a potent message, a very powerful message to Venezuela, to everybody, that there is aid that is trying to get across, but the army is stopping it,” Branson said. “That hopefully will mean that Juan Guaido and his people will have a better chance to have another election where sense can prevail.”
Guaido, who heads Venezuela’s opposition-controlled congress, declared himself interim president Jan. 23 with the backing of the United States and most South American and European nations, which argue that Maduro’s re-election last May was fraudulent. Guaido has announced that humanitarian aid will enter Venezuela on Saturday, the day after Branson’s concert.
Branson said the initiative follows his involvement with Live Aid and years of work with “The Elders,” a group of elder statesmen and political leaders that he helped establish to avoid conflict and assist in humanitarian situations.
“I talked to Juan Guaido, and the team, the people around him, to see what could be most helpful,” Branson said. “And they said that the thing that Venezuela needed the most was medical help in particular, money to be raised to try to keep doctors and nurses in Venezuela, not leaving Venezuela, and just basic medical help.”
Meanwhile, Guaido said the move by Maduro’s government to put on a rival concert was “desperate.”
“They’re debating whether the aid should come in or not ... They don’t know what to do,” Guaido said Monday. “They’re now making up a concert. How many concerts are they going to stage?“
Venezuela’s information minister also said the government would distribute 20,000 boxes of subsidized food Saturday.
Maduro’s government has been providing people with deeply discounted boxes of cooking oil, flour and other items, while coming under accusations it is using food as a political tool.