VIDEO: Abu Dhabi Crown Prince honors loyal staff member

Abu Dhabi Crown Prince honors loyal staff member. (Twitter/@MohamedBinZayed)
Updated 24 January 2018
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VIDEO: Abu Dhabi Crown Prince honors loyal staff member

ABU DHABI:A long-serving staff member has been praised by Abu Dhabi Crown Prince and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan.
Mohideen has worked in the office of the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi for more than 40 years. A video and photo were released on social media showing the appreciation by the Crown Prince and other officials.
India’s ambassador to the UAE, Navdeep Singh Suri, retweeted the video, saying:“Such a noble and gracious gesture by HH Sheikh @MohamedBinZayed toward a long-serving Indian member of his staff. Shows true class.”
The Crown Prince’s acknowledgment has been applauded by the Indian community not only in the UAE but also across the world. “Such a precious moment for the man. An amazing gesture by HH,” tweeted @gargankur22, Ankur Garg, who is based in Dubai.
The UAE is a home to a large number of Indian expatriates. India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, is scheduled to visit Dubai to attend the World Government Summit early next month.


Python selfie puts Indian forest ranger in tight spot

Updated 18 June 2018
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Python selfie puts Indian forest ranger in tight spot

  • The Indian rock python is a non-venomous species, but it can quickly kill its prey by constricting blood flow

KOLKATA: An India forestry ranger found himself in a bind after a python briefly strangled him while he posed for pictures with the giant snake.
Wildlife officer Sanjay Dutta was called in Sunday by frantic villagers in West Bengal after they saw the 40-kilogramme (88-pound) python swallowing a goat alive.
Instead of placing it safely inside a bag, the ranger wrapped it around his neck and posed for pictures with stunned villagers.
But panic spread as the huge snake wound itself around Dutta’s neck, forcing him to struggle to free himself from its vice-like grip.
He escaped unscathed, but a little red-faced.
The Indian rock python is a non-venomous species, but it can quickly kill its prey by constricting blood flow and can grow up to 10 meters (33 feet) long.
West Bengal’s forest department has launched an official inquiry into the ranger’s conduct and flouting of safety protocols.
But Dutta said he only wanted to save the reptile from the villagers who were readying to club it to death with sticks.
“My first instinct was to rescue the snake. I carried it on my shoulders and held its mouth firmly,” Dutta told AFP.
“I was not scared for even a moment (when the python tightened its grip) because had I panicked, it could have been fatal.”
Dutta said he did not have a bag to carry the snake, which he transported to a safe location in his car and released into the wild.