Davos: India PM Modi warns that globalization is ‘losing its luster’

Updated 23 January 2018
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Davos: India PM Modi warns that globalization is ‘losing its luster’

DAVOS: Globalization is “slowly losing its luster” in an age of protectionism, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi warned the World Economic Forum on Tuesday, as he made a rallying cry for free trade.
Modi said the recent wave of trade protectionism, in which governments raise barriers to free trade between nations, is “worrisome.”
“It feels like the opposite of globalization is happening,” he told the forum.
“Forces of protectionism are raising their heads against globalization ... The solution to this worrisome situation against globalization is not isolation.”
Modi did not single out Donald Trump's administration in his address, but his words can be seen as a counter to the “America First” stance of the US president.
The Indian PM delivered the speech on Tuesday just hours after the Trump government approved tariffs on imported solar-energy components and large washing machines in a bid to help US manufacturers.
Modi is leading a big government and business delegation to the summit in Davos, the first Indian prime minister do so in 21 years, aiming to showcase India as a fast-growing economic power and a potential driver of global growth.


Flight rights group takes Ryanair to court over strike compensation

Updated 15 August 2018
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Flight rights group takes Ryanair to court over strike compensation

  • Ryanair had to cancel around 1 in 6 flights last week due to a walk-out by pilots in five European countries
  • The disruption affected 55,000 travelers

BERLIN: German passenger rights company Flightright is taking Ryanair to court over whether it should pay financial compensation to passengers affected by strikes at Europe’s largest low-cost carrier.
Ryanair had to cancel around 1 in 6 flights on Friday due to a walk-out by pilots in five European countries, disrupting an estimated 55,000 travelers.
The worst affected country was Germany, where 250 flights affected around 42,000 passengers.
EU rules state that passengers can claim monetary compensation of up to €400 for flights within the region for canceled or delayed flights, unless the reason is extraordinary circumstances, such as bad weather.
Strikes have generally fallen under extraordinary circumstances although a ruling by the European Court of Justice in April said that a wildcat strike by staff at German airline TUIfly following a restructuring could not be classed as extraordinary circumstances. Flightright said it believes Ryanair is therefore obliged to pay monetary compensation to customers and so has filed a complaint with a court in Frankfurt in a bid to clarify the rules around strikes.
A spokeswoman for the court said she was aware of the Flightright statement, but that she had not yet seen the complaint.
Ryanair said it fully complies with the European legislation on the matter, known as EU261.
“Under EU261 legislation, no compensation is payable when the union is acting unreasonably and totally beyond the airline’s control. If this was within our control, there would be no cancelations,” a spokesman said.
Passenger rights groups such as Flightright help passengers to claim compensation from airlines under EU261 rules but in exchange for a share of the compensation received.
Many European airlines, including Ryanair, therefore urge passengers to file claims with them directly instead.