Trudeau announces Pacific trade deal without US

nternational diplomats attend a meeting to push for sanctions and criminal charges against the perpetrators of chemical attacks in Syria, at the Foreign Affairs ministry in Paris on January 23, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 24 January 2018
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Trudeau announces Pacific trade deal without US

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada and 10 other countries of the Trans-Pacific Partnership have agreed to a revised trade agreement.
The deal comes exactly one year after US President Donald Trump withdrew his country from the agreement.
The agreement follows two days of high-level talks in Tokyo and was confirmed by Canadian International Trade Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne. The partners are now expected to work toward signing the agreement by early March.
Trudeau told a crowd at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, that the pact meets Canada's objectives of creating and sustaining growth, prosperity and well-paying middle-class jobs today and for generations to come.
The agreement comes amid worries that Trump will pull the US out of the North American Free Trade deal. Seventy-five percent of Canada's trade goes to the US.


Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

Updated 23 March 2019
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Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

  • Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China
  • Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets

BEIJING: Apple chief executive Tim Cook nudged China on Saturday to open up and said the future would depend on global collaboration, as the United States and China remained locked in a bitter trade dispute.
“We encourage China to continue to open up, we see that as essential, not only for China to reach its full potential, but for the global economy to thrive,” Cook said at a China Development Forum in Beijing.
Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets, some analysts worry that its reform project has slowed or even stalled under President Xi Jinping, who has sought greater control over the economy and a bigger role for state-owned firms at the expense of the private sector.
Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China because of a contracting smartphone market, increasing pressure from Chinese rivals, and slowing upgrade cycles. The company reported a revenue drop of 26 percent in the greater China region during the quarter ending in December.
Before those results came out, in a January letter to investors, Cook blamed the company’s poor China performance on trade tension between the United States and China, suggesting that pressure on the economy was hurting sales in China.