Toys ‘R’ Us says to shut about 180 US stores

The company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in September casting doubt over the future of its 64,000 employees and nearly 1,600 stores. (Reuters)
Updated 24 January 2018
0

Toys ‘R’ Us says to shut about 180 US stores

BENGALURU: Toys ‘R’ Us said on Tuesday it will shut about one-fifth of its stores in the US in the coming months, as the toy store chain tries to emerge from one of the largest ever bankruptcies by a specialty retailer.
The closure of about 180 US stores will begin in early February and continue until mid-April, Chief Executive David Brandon said in a letter on its website.
The company filed for bankruptcy protection just ahead of the crucial holiday season in the US and Canada to restructure $5 billion of long-term debt, casting doubt over the future of its 64,000 employees and nearly 1,600 stores.
All 83 Toys ‘R’ Us stores in Canada will remain open, said president of the Canadian unit, Melanie Teed-Murch, in a letter to customers.
Toys ‘R’ Us, which like other traditional brick-and-mortar retailers has struggled as more and more consumers shop online, is taking steps to try and entice customers to its stores.
The retailer planned to close unprofitable locations and improve its website and loyalty programs while investing in its stores, according to bankruptcy court papers.
Toys ‘R’ Us, which also operates the Babies ‘R’ Us chain, has set aside more than $400 million out of its$3.1 billion in bankruptcy loans for sprucing up about 900 stores over the next three years with more experiences and better-paid staff.
As the Wayne, New Jersey-based company aims to exit bankruptcy in 2018, its efforts to reinvent its stores will shape how other retailers look to experiential shopping to tackle e-commerce.


EU could compensate firms hit by US sanctions over Iran — French minister

Updated 20 May 2018
0

EU could compensate firms hit by US sanctions over Iran — French minister

  • In 1996, when the United States tried to penalize foreign companies trading with Cuba, the EU forced Washington to back down by threatening retaliatory sanctions

PARIS: France is looking to see if the European Union could compensate European companies that might be facing sanctions by the United States for doing business with Iran, said French finance minister Bruno Le Maire on Sunday.
Le Maire referred to EU rules going back to 1996 which he said could allow the EU to intervene in this manner to protect European companies against any US sanctions, adding that France wanted the EU to toughen its stance in this area.
In 1996, when the United States tried to penalize foreign companies trading with Cuba, the EU forced Washington to back down by threatening retaliatory sanctions.
European firms doing business in Iran face sanctions from the United States after President Donald Trump withdrew from a 2015 nuclear deal with Iran.
“Are we going to allow the United States to be the economic policeman of the world? The answer is no,” Le Maire told C News TV and Europe 1 radio on Sunday.
Le Maire added it was important Italy kept its EU budget commitments, in light of plans by Italy’s new coalition government to ramp up spending — which could put Rome at odds with the EU.