Arab coalition in Yemen hands over child-soldiers forced to fight by Houthi terrorists

This july 16, 2017 file photo shows a Yemeni boy posing with a Kalashnikov assault rifle during a gathering of newly-recruited Houthi terrorist fighters in the capital Sanaa. (Mohammed Huwais/AFP)
Updated 25 January 2018
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Arab coalition in Yemen hands over child-soldiers forced to fight by Houthi terrorists

DUBAI: The Saudi Arabian-led coalition in Yemen has handed 27 children to the Yemeni government after they were caught fighting with Houthi terrorist fighters on the border with the Kingdom, state news agency SPA reported.
An official coalition source said the Houthi militia were forcing Yemeni children to fight on the frontline.
The children were handed over at Sharourah force command in the presence of representatives from various organizations including members of the coalition forces, the International Committee of the Red Cross, the Saudi Red Crescent Authority, and the head of Child Protection Unit in Armed Conflict.
The children were transported by bus to Marib.


Lebanese women hail first female Arab interior minister

Updated 53 sec ago
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Lebanese women hail first female Arab interior minister

  • Though Lebanon is widely held to be liberal by regional standards, with women playing a prominent role in public life, some of its laws continue to uphold a patriarchal social code
BEIRUT: Lebanon has appointed the Arab world’s first female interior minister in its new government, prising open a wider foothold for women in its overwhelmingly male political scene.
Raya Al-Hassan is one of four women to take Cabinet jobs in the new coalition, more than ever before in Lebanon and three more than in the last government, in which even the minister for women was a man.
Though Hassan has already held top jobs — including finance minister in 2009-2011 — her appointment to a portfolio managing security was hailed as a step forward for women in Lebanese politics.
“This is a point of pride for all women and all the people who believe in women’s capabilities,” Hassan said.
“There are a lot of female interior and defense ministers in the world and they have proved their efficiency. It might be a new phenomenon for Lebanon and Arab countries, but hopefully it will be repeated and not be unique,” she added.
The three other women in the 30-strong Cabinet are in charge of energy, administrative development and the economic empowerment of women and young people.
Though Lebanon is widely held to be liberal by regional standards, with women playing a prominent role in public life, some of its laws continue to uphold a patriarchal social code.
Many of Lebanon’s civil laws, including personal status matters such as marriage, divorce and inheritance, are applied according to religious sect and in some cases treats women differently than men. Lebanon has 17 recognized Muslim and Christian sects.
In 2017 the Parliament abolished an old law that absolved rapists if they married their victims. But marital rape and child marriage are still legal.