A getaway in Goa: Discover this picture-perfect destination for yourself

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With its picture-perfect beaches, rich cultural history and delicious food, Goa may just be the ultimate weekend break destination. (Shutterstock)
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The Taj Exotica Resort & Spa presides as the grand dame of Goa’s luxury hotels.
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The Taj Exotica Resort & Spa presides as the grand dame of Goa’s luxury hotels.
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The Taj Exotica Resort & Spa presides as the grand dame of Goa’s luxury hotels.
Updated 30 January 2018
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A getaway in Goa: Discover this picture-perfect destination for yourself

GOA: Over the years, Goa has come to be known as many things — from hippy hangout to wellness retreat. It is all of these of course, but what one can often forget amidst the swirl of negative headlines and, indeed, the inescapable march of development, it is so much more too.
This swathe of postcard-perfect prettiness on India’s western coast has a unique cultural identity thanks to its Portuguese colonial heritage — also partly responsible for its delicious cuisine — which, combined with the stunning coastline fringed with tropical foliage and an inimitable spirit of joie-de-vivre, has drawn in travelers from all around the world who seem to find the exact form of nirvana they were seeking.
Here is an insider guide to staying, seeing and eating in Goa that will help you make the most of a quick getaway to this beach haven.
Where to stay
Steer away from the over-crowded beaches of north Goa and head to the quieter southern coast, where, on the unspoilt Benaulim beach, the Taj Exotica Resort & Spa presides as the grand dame of Goa’s luxury hotels. Spread across 56-acres of lush landscaped grounds — which includes a private putting green — the low-lying resort oozes a stately, old-world charm made only more inviting with the warm Indian hospitality Taj hotels are known for (starting with the welcome reception of a seashell garland, tropical drink and lively Goan music as soon as you enter).
Make like the many A-listers who have holidayed here — from Bollywood stars like Amitabh Bachchan to Hollywood royalty and world leaders — and check in to one of their newly-refurbished villa rooms, which boast private plunge pools. Housed in colorful hacienda-style villas, the oversized accommodations feature traditional local décor accents and plush amenities ranging from pillow menus to marble-clad bathrooms with claw foot tubs and luxury Ayurvedic bath products.
The hotel is also home to a well-equipped kids’ club, complete with daily activities and water slides, and many of the rooms are designed to be inter-connecting, making it ideal for a family break.
With the golden beach just footsteps away; multiple dining options including traditional Goan cuisine, fresh seafood right by the beach at the chilled-out Lobster Shack restaurant and a lavish breakfast buffet best enjoyed alfresco in the Mediterranean-inspired Sala da Pranzo restaurant; plus, expert therapists at the award-winning Jiva spa at hand to enable the ultimate holiday relaxation, there is enough here to tempt you to never leave the resort during your stay. But it is worth tearing yourself away to check out some of Goa’s unique heritage.
What to see and do
This city-state on India’s western coast, part of the Konkan belt, was a long-held Portuguese colony from the 1600s to 1800s, which led to the development of its own hybrid culture and cuisine.
And while lying on the beach and doing nothing is a very important part of a trip to Goa — it is impossible not to have relaxation wash all over you when lounging to the accompaniment of the crashing of the waves, tropical sunshine, and laid-back vibes — you would be amiss if you did not check out some of its incredibly-rich cultural relics.
From ancient churches and sacred Hindu temples, to 17th century forts and even some noteworthy historic mosques, it is all here. Depending on which area you base yourself in, you are probably never too far from a cute little neighborhood church or historic house. But a trip to UNESCO World Heritage Site Old Goa, or Velha Goa — an inland riverside district — is not to be missed.
Replete with cathedrals and churches featuring traditional Renaissance architecture, this is where you will also find what is probably Goa’s most famous attraction, the Basilica of Bom Jesus. Also worth trekking out for is Fort Aguada, a scenic ruin providing panoramic views and the perfect sunset vantage point.
In Goa, history coexists effortlessly with a contemporary, global arts and design scene, which you can explore at the numerous eclectic galleries and boutiques that have mushroomed over the years. The capital city of Panaji (or Panjim) is the best place to discover everything from Goa’s best-known fashion export Wendell Rodricks’ collections, to contemporary art galleries.
What to eat
An amalgam of indigenous and colonial elements, Goan cuisine is wonderfully eclectic, complex, flavorful and quite fiery. Seafood, naturally, is a mainstay, as is coconut — in true tropical tradition — which are complemented with an array of spices and culinary influences as varied as Portuguese, Asian, Konkani and Malabari and even Arabian.
In Goa, you are never too far from the staple diet of fish fry — typically done here with a spicy marinade and semolina crumb — or fish curry with rice, which you simply cannot go wrong with.
But to try some rarer authentic dishes in a refined fine dining setting, Miguel Arcanjo’s restaurant at the Taj Exotica resort is not to be missed.
The Goan chef draws upon memories and family recipes as well as his own travels around the world to serve up specialties such as prawns piri piri (stir-fried in a spicy sauce); mushroom rissioes (Goan-style empanadas); the classic chicken cafreal (grilled chicken in a coriander and chilli sauce); and xacuti (a curry made with 12 different spices, which can be made with chicken or seafood) which are best mopped up with sannas, steamed rice flour patties that tread that fine line between sweet and savory.
An integral part of Goan cuisine is the wide array of sweets, of which many, expectedly, rely heavily on coconut. If you only try one dessert in Goa, make it the signature bebinca — a rich, layered coconut cake, which pairs beautifully with ice cream. The dry cake also makes for a great culinary souvenir and is available at many stores in Goa.
In fact, bebinca may well be the perfect gastronomic metaphor for the multi-layered, moreish and delightfully sweet destination that is Goa.


Mariam’s journey to North Pole ‘an inspiration for Saudi women’

Crossing the unwelcoming terrain of the North Pole is not for the faint-hearted. Mariam Hamidaddin’s brave and inspirational journey to the top of the earth was ended by the threat of frostbite. Reuters
Updated 20 May 2018
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Mariam’s journey to North Pole ‘an inspiration for Saudi women’

  • Mariam Hamidaddin was one of 11 women from Europe and the Middle East taking part in the recent Women’s Euro-Arabian Polar Expedition, an initiative aimed to foster greater dialogue and inspire women to push their limits and fulfill their ambitions.
  • Two weeks later and Hamidaddin still could not feel her fingertips. She struggles to cut a steak and needs help to tie her shoelaces. Medics say it could be months or even years before she fully recovers.

LONDON: Mariam Hamidaddin was skiing toward the North Pole in temperatures as low as minus 38 C when she was advised by her team leader to give up on her dream and take a helicopter back to base camp.
She did so reluctantly. Frostbite had taken its toll on the Jeddah-born entrepreneur’s hands, but with no previous experience of such climates, Hamidaddin was unaware of the severity. Only when she was assessed by a Russian medic who spoke pidgin English did she appreciate how close she was to losing her fingers.
“The words he told me were: ‘No chop’ ... which was scary but also a great relief to hear,” said Hamidaddin, one of 11 women from Europe and the Middle East taking part in the recent Women’s Euro-Arabian Polar Expedition, an initiative aimed to foster greater dialogue and inspire women to push their limits and fulfill their ambitions. Team leader Felicity Aston deliberately chose women with no athletic or Arctic experience with the intention of demonstrating that anybody can achieve their goals with determination.
As Hamidaddin discovered, however, having an expert on hand helps. The transition from frostnip to frostbite can be a matter of five or 10 minutes, so it is essential for people in extreme weather to pay attention to their body. The tiniest sign can help avoid severe consequences.
The 32-year-old had followed all the instructions learned during training camps in Iceland and Oman: She kept moving to circulate her blood and had not removed her gloves even once in the Arctic. She felt pain, yes, but the entire team had frostnip, so why should she consider quitting?
Fortunately for her future — and her fingers — the decision was taken for her.

Mariam Hamidaddin was an inspirational member of the North Pole expedition before a doctor’s verdict cut her journey short.


“There was no proper moment where I realized I had frostbite,” Hamidaddin told Arab News after returning to the heat of Saudi Arabia. “If it was up to me, I would have wanted to continue, so I am extremely thankful that I was asked to evacuate because the frostbite gradually got worse and worse.
Basically, the team leader saved my fingers.”
Two weeks later and Hamidaddin still could not feel her fingertips. She struggles to cut a steak and needs help to tie her shoelaces. Medics say it could be months or even years before she fully recovers.
This month on her Instagram feed @InTuneToTheSound, she is posting photos of her journey in non-chronological order. The intention is to be “open and vulnerable and hopefully inspire people.” In a post, a video shows her typing at a computer using only her right pinky finger.
“There is a negative media perception of what a Saudi woman looks like and what she can and can’t do,” said Hamidaddin. “For this reason, it’s important for us to show that what you see in the media isn’t necessary a true reflection of who we truly are.
“It is also important to share our failures as well because when I see success upon success, I cannot connect with that. I am human, I have weakness and I fall, and I need to know that when I fall, I can rise again. Those stories are the ones that will connect most with people.”
With Saudi Arabia women now competing at the Olympic Games, being allowed to attend football matches at certain stadiums and the imminent lifting of a ban on driving, opportunities for women in the Kingdom are blossoming.
Hamidaddin, founder of the Humming Tree, a co-working space and community center that focuses on creativity and wellbeing, said she sees examples of strong, athletic and confident women every day.
“You can see them everywhere — women running, biking, climbing mountains,” she said.
“So we are already there. It’s just a matter of sharing these stories more. We are strong women; we know what we want and we find a way around it. We do what we need to do and we get it done. The fact that driving now is going to be open for us, just makes all that easier.”
Although Hamidaddin’s journey to the North Pole was cut short, the team’s doctor said she could wait out the expedition in the warmth of base camp and celebrate with her team when they reached their destination.
It was an opportunity that, even with frostbite, she was never going to turn down. What she found at the top of the world was a beautiful, dreamlike landscape — and, perhaps fittingly, a perpetual chase to reach her goal.
“Unlike the South Pole, which is a landmass, the North Pole is a constantly drifting landscape. It’s sea ice on top of the Arctic Ocean and it’s always moving, so you are constantly trying to catch it,” she said.
“One minute you’re on top of the world taking a photo and by the time you’re done taking it, well, the North Pole is a few miles away. You have to keep trying to catch it.”