Aquarium hosts first-ever penguins in Saudi Arabia

Humboldt penguins live between 15 and 20 years, and can grow as high as 70 cm and weigh from 3.5 to 6 kg.
Updated 31 January 2018
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Aquarium hosts first-ever penguins in Saudi Arabia

JEDDAH: Monday witnessed the introduction of penguins in Saudi Arabia for the first time, at Fakieh Aquarium in Jeddah.
“We’re delighted to bring the first-ever group of penguins to Saudi Arabia,” Zaki Sadayo, executive manager of the aquarium, told Arab News at the unveiling of the new penguin tank.
Sara Al-Ghamdi, head of education at the aquarium, said the eight Humboldt penguins were born in Peru and range in age from 2 to 4 years.
Their previous home was the Parque Zoologico de Huachipa in Peru, where they were cared for from birth by zookeepers.
“Humboldt penguins live between 15 and 20 years, and can grow as high as 70 cm and weigh from 3.5 to 6 kg,” Al-Ghamdi told Arab News.
“The species is native to South America, mainly to the coasts of Chile and Peru. The aquarium has put great care and effort into designing and building a home that duplicates the penguins’ natural habitat,” she added.
“It took more than a year to create a world-class exhibit using the experience of different fields of expertise by national and international civil engineers, biologists, veterinarians and specialists in life-support systems from four continents.”
The aquarium contains more than 200 species of marine life from around the world, including sharks, stingrays, seahorses and jellyfish.
Fakieh is the only public aquarium in Saudi Arabia, offering education and entertainment programs on marine life for various age groups.
To date, the aquarium has hosted around 35,000 students from 192 schools, and more than 600 children with special needs from 10 care centers. In addition to the penguins, families can enjoy a dolphin and sea lion show every day.
 


Saudi Arabia says missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi is dead

Updated 20 October 2018
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Saudi Arabia says missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi is dead

  • The journalist died after a fistfight at the consulate in Istanbul
  • Deputy intelligence chief, royal court adviser removed from positions, 18 Saudis arrested

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia announced on Saturday the death of missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi, saying a preliminary investigation indicated he lost his life after a fight at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.
“The discussions between Jamal Khashoggi and those he met at the kingdom's consulate in Istanbul... devolved into a fistfight, leading to his death,” the Saudi Press Agency said, citing the public prosecutor.
Eighteen Saudis have been arrested in connection with the incident and the investigation is ongoing, the public prosecutor said.
“The Kingdom expresses its deep regret at the painful developments that have taken place and stresses the commitment of the authorities in the Kingdom to bring the facts to the public opinion, to hold all those involved accountable and bring them to justice,” a statement on the SPA said.
Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist who lived in the US, disappeared on Oct. 2 after visiting the consulate to complete paperwork related to his divorce.
Deputy intelligence chief Ahmed Al-Asiri was removed from his position and Saud Al-Qahtani from his advisory role at the Royal Court, through royal decrees.
Three other intelligence officials who were also sacked have been named as Mohammad bin Saleh Al-Rumaih, Abdullah bin Khalifa Al-Shaya and Rashad bin Hamed Al-Muhamadi.
King Salman also ordered the creation of a ministerial committee, headed by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, to restructure the country’s General Intelligence agency and issue the results of its work within a month.
Members of the committee include the interior and foreign ministers as well as the heads of the General Intelligence and State Security.
A team of Saudi investigators were sent to Istanbul and have been working on the case with Turkish detectives, who entered the consulate on Thursday.
Earlier in the week, Saudi Arabia promised a thorough and transparent investigation into what happened to the journalist in Turkey.