US oil prices extend gains on compliance with output cuts

US West Texas Intermediate crude was up 33 cents, or 0.5 percent, at $66.13 a barrel. (Reuters)
Updated 02 February 2018
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US oil prices extend gains on compliance with output cuts

TOKYO: Oil rose for a third day on Friday after a survey showed strong compliance with output cuts by OPEC and others including Russia, offsetting concerns about surging US production.
Brent futures, the global benchmark, were up 24 cents, or 0.3 percent, at $69.89 a barrel by 0635 GMT.
US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude was up 33 cents, or 0.5 percent, at $66.13 a barrel.
Production by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) rose in January from an eight-month low as higher output from Nigeria and Saudi Arabia offset a further decline in Venezuela and strong compliance with a supply reduction pact, a Reuters survey showed.
OPEC pumped 32.4 million barrels per day (bpd) in January, the survey found, up 100,000 bpd from December. Last month’s total was revised down by 110,000 bpd to the lowest since April 2017.
Even so, adherence by producers included in the deal to curb supply rose to 138 percent from 137 percent in December, the survey found, suggesting commitment is not wavering even as oil prices hit their highest level since 2014.
“It underscores the commitment of the group, and their Russian partners, to keep a floor under the oil price,” said Greg McKenna, chief market strategist at futures brokerage AxiTrader.
That is drawing investors’ focus away from the rise in US production.
US crude output surpassed 10 million bpd in November for the first time since 1970, the Energy Information Administration said this week.


Head of Saudi Arabia’s SRC: ‘Ask banks for a mortgage, and we will refinance it’

Updated 25 April 2019
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Head of Saudi Arabia’s SRC: ‘Ask banks for a mortgage, and we will refinance it’

  • SRC CEO Fabrice Susini: One of our key objectives is to ensure that the banks are extending loans to more and more people
  • Extending home-ownership is one of the cornerstones of the Vision 2030 strategy to diversify the economy away from oil production

RIYADH: The head of the state-owned Saudi Real Estate Refinance Company (SRC) has made an unprecedented offer to the Kingdom’s home-seekers to underwrite future mortgages.
Speaking at the Financial Sector Conference in Riyadh, Fabrice Susini, SRC CEO, told the audience: “Ask them (the banks) for a mortgage, and we will refinance it.”
Although Susini later clarified his remarks to show that he still expected normal standards of mortgage applications to be met, the on-stage show of bravado illustrates SRC’s commitment to facilitate home-ownership in the Kingdom.
“Obviously if you have no revenue, no income, poor credit history, that will not apply. Now if you have a job, it is different. We have people in senior positions at big foreign banks that could not get a mortgage,” he explained.
He said that Saudi banks have traditionally assessed mortgages on the basis of “flow stability” of earnings. Government employees, or those of big corporations like Saudi Aramco and SABIC, found it easy to get mortgages “because you were there for life.”
“One of our key objectives is to ensure that the banks are extending loans to more and more people. The government is pushing for entrepreneurship, private development, private jobs. If you work in the private sector and cannot get a mortgage the next thing you will do is go to the government for a job,” Susini said.
Extending home-ownership is one of the cornerstones of the Vision 2030 strategy to diversify the economy away from oil production. Saudi Arabia has one of the lowest rates of mortgage penetration of any G20 country — in single digit percentages, compared with others at up to 50 percent.