Kalash cultural preservation project launched in Pakistan

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Little Kalasha girls in their traditional dresses. (File photo)
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The Kalasha community during a festival.(File photo)
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The Kalasha community during a festival. (File photo)
Updated 03 February 2018
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Kalash cultural preservation project launched in Pakistan

PESHAWAR:The Directorate of Archaeology and Museums in Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) province launched its “Presevation and Promotion of Kalash Valley” project over the weekend.
Nawazud Din, research officer at the directorate, said the Rs60 million ($543,000) project aims to promote and conserve the unique culture of the ancient Kalash community — an endangered minority in the Hindukush mountain belt of Chitral in northern Pakistan — as well as to attract tourism.
“Kalash has a great deal of tourism potential,” he told Arab News, saying both local and international travelers would find the area had much to offer.
Kalash architecture is a unique mixture of ancient woodcraft and the medieval traditions of figure art. Kalash buildings typically feature magnificently carved wooden pillars and beams decorated with human and animal figures and effigies — each one depicting a certain myth and superstition.
The area — divided into three main sub-valleys: Barir, Bamboret and Rumbor — is also known for its local handicrafts, including the spinning and weaving of rugs, carpets, belts and headgear. Sayed Gul Kalashi, manager of Chitral Museum, said the valley’s population is currently a little over 4,000. And Kalash activists have been raising concerns over the speed with which that number is shrinking.
The Kalash tribe has been settled in the valley for centuries. The people are widely believed to be descended from Alexander the Great’s soldiers. Indeed, Kalashi told Arab News that when a group of Greek nationals arrived in the valley a few decades ago, the locals were shocked at the resemblance between them and their guests.
The later Greek visitors, she said, “worked for the welfare of the locals” and earned their respect. They launched education and health projects “because the area is underdeveloped and lacks basic amenities,” and also set up a museum in Bamboret.
Chitral’s deputy commissioner, Irshad Sadhar, told Arab News that local authorities have banned the purchase or sale of land in Kalash valley in order to protect cultural heritage sites.
“We are preserving their places of worship, graveyards and where they usually dance during their festivals,” he explained, adding that they are also “creating places for tourists too.”


What We Are Reading Today: Millions, Billions, Zillions by Brian W. Kernighan

Updated 19 October 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Millions, Billions, Zillions by Brian W. Kernighan

  • Numbers are often intimidating, confusing, and even deliberately deceptive
  • Misunderstanding numbers can have serious consequences

Numbers are often intimidating, confusing, and even deliberately deceptive— especially when they are really big. The media loves to report on millions, billions, and trillions, but frequently makes basic mistakes or presents such numbers in misleading ways. 

And misunderstanding numbers can have serious consequences, since they can deceive us in many of our most important decisions, including how to vote, what to buy, and whether to make a financial investment. In this short, accessible, enlightening, and entertaining book, leading computer scientist Brian Kernighan teaches anyone — even diehard math-phobes — how to demystify the numbers that assault us every day.

With examples drawn from a rich variety of sources, including journalism, advertising, and politics, Kernighan demonstrates how numbers can mislead and misrepresent. In chapters covering big numbers, units, dimensions, and more, he lays bare everything from deceptive graphs to speciously precise numbers. And he shows how anyone — using a few basic ideas and lots of shortcuts — can easily learn to recognize common mistakes, determine whether numbers are credible, and make their own sensible estimates when needed.

Giving you the simple tools you need to avoid being fooled by dubious numbers, Millions, Billions, Zillions is an essential survival guide for a world drowning in big — and often bad — data.

Brian W. Kernighan is professor of computer science at Princeton University. His many books include Understanding the Digital World: What You Need to Know about Computers, the Internet, Privacy, and Security (Princeton). He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.