Umm Kulthum hashtag trends as Egyptians mark 43rd anniversary

Umm Kulthum remains a celebrated figure among Egyptians, many regarding her as the greatest singer of all time. (Pixgood.com)
Updated 03 February 2018
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Umm Kulthum hashtag trends as Egyptians mark 43rd anniversary

The late Egyptian diva Umm Kulthum was among twitter trending topics Saturday as Egyptians marked the 43rd anniversary of the legendary singer’s passing.
More than 40 years after her death, Umm Kulthum is still celebrated by Egyptians, who regard her voice as the greatest of all time.
Known as the grand dame of Arab singing and the “Star of the Orient,” Umm Kulthum’s rich voice still resonates across the Arab world.
Twitter users shared their favorite songs through tweets that went viral on the Internet.
“I was born several years after her passing, but I still adore her voice and choice of lyrics,” wrote one Tweep.
“Years after her death, dozens have come out, but she remains the only one,” another twitter user said.
Umm Kulthum passed away on the 3rd of February 1975, aged 77. Hundreds of thousands turned out for her funeral in what is still recounted as an exceptional scene in Egyptian history.
Her legacy continues to live on as her songs pass from one generation to another, providing a unique essence of the history and culture of Egypt and the Arab world during her time.


What We Are Reading Today: Hard Ball: The Abuse of Power in Pro Team Sports

Updated 13 December 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Hard Ball: The Abuse of Power in Pro Team Sports

  • In Hard Ball, James Quirk and Rodney Fort take on a daunting challenge: Explaining exactly how things have gotten to this point and proposing a way out

Authors: James Quirk & Rodney Fort

What can possibly account for the strange state of affairs in professional sports today? There are billionaire owners and millionaire players, but both groups are constantly squabbling over money. Many pro teams appear to be virtual “cash machines,” generating astronomical annual revenues, but their owners seem willing to uproot them and move to any city willing to promise increased profits. 

At the same time, mayors continue to cook up “sweetheart deals” that lavish benefits on wealthy teams while imposing crushing financial hardships on cities that are already strapped with debt. To fans today, professional sports teams often look more like professional extortionists.   

In Hard Ball, James Quirk and Rodney Fort take on a daunting challenge: Explaining exactly how things have gotten to this point and proposing a way out. They are writing for sports fans who are trying to make sense out of the perplexing world of pro team sports. It is not money, in itself, that is the cause of today’s problems, they assert.

In fact, the real problem stems from one simple fact: Pro sports are monopolies that are fully sanctioned by the US government. Eliminate the monopolies, say Quirk and Fort, and all problems can be solved. If the monopolies are allowed to persist, so will today’s woes.