Tom Brady has no plans of retirement after Patriots Super Bowl loss

NFL Football - Philadelphia Eagles v New England Patriots - Super Bowl LII - U.S. Bank Stadium, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S. - February 4, 2018 New England Patriots' Tom Brady walks off dejected after the game REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Updated 05 February 2018
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Tom Brady has no plans of retirement after Patriots Super Bowl loss

LONDON: Tom Brady said he has no plans to call it quits after his New England Patriots were beaten by the Philadelphia Eagles in a shock Super Bowl result in Minneapolis.
Brady and the Patriots were red-hot favorites to see off the Eagles, who were in their first Super Bowl and expected to merely play the part of whipping boys as Brady went in search of a sixth Super Bowl ring.
But the Eagles, led by the brilliant Nick Foles, swooped to a 41-33 victory to surprise greatest NFL dynasty of the past two decades and most of the watching public.
Afterwards Brady, who will be 41 when the next season gets under way, declared he would continue to go in search of more Super Bowl wins despite the defeat.
The Patriots star quarterback has previously indicated he plans to play into his mid-40s, fitness permitting, even though his wife, the Brazilian supermodel Gisele Bundchen has made it known she would like him to retire.
On Sunday, Brady said the defeat had not changed his outlook.
“I expect to be back,” Brady told reporters. “It’s 15 minutes after the game ended, so I would like to process this. I don’t see why I wouldn’t be back.”
Pressed later about whether he intended to return, he added: “I certainly hope so.”
Should he return he is likely to lead a very different Patriots side. Even before the defeat the team had shown signs of breaking apart.
Those fissures widened even further in the aftermath of a shattering loss, when star tight end Rob Gronkowski hinted that he may have played his last game in the NFL.
Gronkowski, still only 28, told reporters he planned to take time to consider his future in the off-season following the loss.
Gronkowski was badly shaken by a concussion last month against Jacksonville, an incident which added to a laundry list of injuries the 6ft 6in tight end has suffered during his career.
Asked about the rumors suggesting he may retire, Gronkowski said: “I don’t know how you heard that, but I’m definitely going to look at my future for sure.”
“I’m going to sit down in the next couple of weeks and see where I’m at.”
If Gronkowski does retire, it would leave a gaping hole in the Patriots’ offense.
Gronkowski is one of the favored targets of quarterback Brady.
On top of that Offensive co-ordinator Josh McDaniels, with whom Brady has forged a close relationship, is expected to leave in the summer to pursue a head coaching job with the Indianapolis Colts.
McDaniels refused to entertain questions about his future on Sunday. “I’m not talking about that tonight,” he said.
As well as McDaniels’ expected departure, head coach Bill Belichick is also likely to have to find a new defensive co-ordinator, with Matt Patricia linked to a move as head coach of the Detroit Lions.
Patriots defensive back Devin McCourty appeared resigned to Patricia’s departure. “He’s given a big piece of him each year for eight years now,” McCourty said.
“I think that’s what makes him want more.”
Patricia, too, deflected questions about his future.
“Right now, it is all about the game and Philly and my disappointment in the outcome of the game tonight,” Patricia said.
“I just feel really bad for our guys and that we didn’t put them in a situation that allowed them to be successful in the game,” Patricia said.
New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick walks off the field after the NFL Super Bowl 52 football game against the Philadelphia Eagles Sunday, Feb. 4, 2018, in Minneapolis. The Eagles won 41-33. (AP)

BELICHICK BLAMES COACHING MISTAKES
New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick blamed coaching mistakes for his team’s upset Super Bowl loss to the Philadelphia Eagles.
The most successful coach in Super Bowl history was left shellshocked after the Eagles conjured up one of the great performances to win in an all-time classic clash.
Belichick, who had been aiming to win his sixth Vince Lombardi Trophy with the Patriots, pinpointed a lackluster first half when New England had been unable to put more points on the board.
“Obviously we didn’t do a good enough job coaching, missed a lot of opportunities offensively in the first half, didn’t play good enough defense, didn’t play good enough in the kicking game,” Belichick said.
“In the end, we just couldn’t quite make enough plays, and that was all on me. Disappointing, but I’m proud of the way our team competed.”
It was the third time Belichick has tasted defeat in a Super Bowl.
Belichick however insisted that despite the defeat his team could be proud of their season.
“These guys are champions, champions of the AFC. They earned that. We just came up a little bit short,” he said.
“Tough, tough, way to end. There’s a lot of really good things that happened this season, but that’s what this game’s about.”


Dutch cap Europe’s World Cup dominance by ousting Japan

Updated 26 June 2019
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Dutch cap Europe’s World Cup dominance by ousting Japan

  • The reigning European champions will need to maintain that composure as they prepare for a meeting with Italy

RENNES, France: Tears were still flowing from Saki Kumagai’s eyes more than 30 minutes later.
With victorious Dutch rivals passing her on the way out of the stadium, Japan’s captain seemed to find solace in speaking about the penalty long after it cost her team a place in the quarterfinals of the Women’s World Cup.
With Tuesday night’s game entering the 90th minute locked at 1-1, Kumagai’s outstretched left arm blocked the shot Vivianne Miedema had aimed into the right side of the net.
“It had my hand for sure,” Kumagai said. “It’s difficult to accept but it’s also sad. I know that is football.”
Referee Melissa Borjas pointed to the penalty spot and Lieke Martens netted her second goal of the game in the 90th minute to seal a 2-1 victory that sent the Netherlands into the quarterfinals for the first time.
“We have made history,” Martens said. “I’m not usually taking the penalties but I felt really good this game. I asked Sherida Spitse if I could take it and she gave it directly to me and I felt quite relaxed about it.”
The reigning European champions will need to maintain that composure as they prepare for a meeting with Italy on Saturday after going one stage further than their Women’s World Cup debut four years ago.
“We were standing in the circle after the match and we were so happy, yelling at each other,” Netherlands coach Sarina Wiegman said. “We were saying, ‘Let’s continue writing history.’“
It is journey’s end for Japan, which won the 2011 tournament and was the runner-up four years later.
The strength of the second-half display counted for nothing.
As befitting a meeting of the Asian and European champions, the game produced some of the slickest action of the World Cup. A backheel flick set up Martens to send the Dutch in front in the 17th minute and Yui Hasegawa equalized in the 43rd to complete a slick passing move.
But the post, crossbar and goalkeeper Sari van Veenendaal thwarted Japan’s pursuit of a winning goal.
“I think we lacked the clinical edge,” Japan coach Asako Takakura said. “We have to accept the result, we’re defeated, we’re very disappointed and for all the players I feel very sorry for them and frustrated.”
With the last Asian team eliminated, the Women’s World Cup will have a record seven European teams in the quarterfinals. Norway and England meet in Le Havre on Thursday and France takes on the United States the following night. After the Netherlands plays Italy on Saturday, Germany and Sweden will meet.
“It’s really tough to be here,” Netherlands forward Miedema said. “Sometimes it kind of feels like a Euros.”
That is a title already won by this team, thanks to Miedema’s goals in the final two years ago on home soil.
The fans won’t have far to travel for the World Cup quarterfinal, with Valenciennes around two hours’ drive from the Netherlands.
It will be another chance for the orange-clad fans who danced and sang their way in a convoy to the stadium on Tuesday to stamp their mark on this tournament.
They were certainly given a game to savor, and an audacious opening goal.
Martens flicked in the opener after evading her marker to meet a corner and send the ball through the legs of Yuika Sugasawa into the net.
Sugasawa had a quick chance to tie, only to hit the post. But Japan did equalize by completing an intricate move.
Hina Sugita squared across the penalty area to Yuika Sugasawa, who passed back to Mana Iwabuchi on the edge of the penalty area. After holding off Jackie Groenen on the turn, Iwabuchi slipped the ball through to Hasegawa, who was free to delicately dink a shot over Van Veenendaal into the corner of the net.
It was some way to make the most of a first shot on target for a team that failed to score in two of its three group stage games.
But parity nearly didn’t last long.
Miedema received the ball from Shanice van de Sanden but with only Ayaka Yamashita to beat struck straight at the Japan goalkeeper.
Van Veenendaal came to the rescue of the Dutch in the second half by denying Emi Nakajima as Japan chased the winner.
“Japan is a world class team and you saw that today,” Miedema said. “In the second half you can see they have loads of quality on the pitch.”