French chef Veyrat seals comeback with third Michelin star

French chef Marc Veyrat, holds a Michelin guide after being awarded the maximum three Michelin stars, during the Michelin guide award ceremony at La Salle Musicale in Boulogne-Billancourt near Paris on February 5, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 06 February 2018
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French chef Veyrat seals comeback with third Michelin star

PARIS: Marc Veyrat, the comeback king of French cuisine, was back at the top of the culinary pecking order Monday after the Michelin guide awarded him the maximum three stars.
The flamboyant chef, who is rarely seen without his black Savoyard hat, has now won the top rating for three different restaurants over the course of his career.
Nine years after Veyrat was forced to give up cooking after a serious skiing accident and three after his alpine restaurant La Maison des Bois burned down, the 67-year-old was back at the summit of French cooking.
As his three stars were announced at a Paris theater, Veyrat told AFP that “you have to hit rock bottom to realize how good things can be,” adding that he felt “like an orphan for the period when I wasn’t in the Michelin guide.”
Famed for his highly inventive creations that mix delicate infusions of wild herbs with hearty traditional Savoyard cooking, Veyrat is one of only two chefs promoted this year to the elite club who hold three stars, the Michelin guide said.
A self-taught master who has spent most of his life cooking in his home village of Manigod 1,600 meters (5,200 feet) up the Alps near Annecy, he has twice been given the maximum 20 out of 20 score by the rival Gault-Millau guide.
Addressing the celebrated chefs, French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe hailed them as ambassadors who “contribute to the influence of French culture.”

Rise of Japanese chefs

The guide’s international director Michael Ellis also cheered the continued rise of Japanese chefs in France with two new two-starred restaurants, Takao Takano’s eatery in Lyon and Masafumi Hamano’s Au 14 Fevrier at nearby Saint-Amour-Bellevue in the Saone-et-Loire region of eastern France.
Five other Japanese chefs got a single star for the first time, including four in Paris led by Ken Kawasaki, the Pertinence run by Ryunosuke Naito and his Malaysian wife and patissier Kwen Liew; Takayuki Nameura of the Montee, and Keisuke Yamagishi of the Etude.
Takashi Kinoshita, who cooks at the Chateau de Courban in northern Burgundy, also made the grade.
“Japanese chefs have great technical skills and their cooking can be extremely precise,” Ellis said.
“France and Japan are quite similar,” said Naito as he celebrated his win. “France is presented to us as the number one in world gastronomy and for me Japan is number two. We both love good ingredients.”
Veyrat’s organic alpine vegetable gardens around his rebuilt restaurant make it almost self-sufficient. He has also pioneered the use of wild mountain herbs in broths and fermentations, and cites the botanist Francois Couplan among his heroes.
Ellis said Veyrat has earned himself “an important place in culinary history. It is very difficult to make characterful food with herbs, flowers and plants, but he does it,” he told AFP, picking out a dish of egg, hay and wood sorrel served with ravioli of “forgotten vegetables” as particularly brilliant.
Renowned fish cook Christophe Bacquie of the Castellet Hotel in the Var region of southeast France was also awarded a third star for the first time.
The 45-year-old is best known for his Mediterranean-influenced recipes, including John Dory, crab and caviar served in a perfumed cream of kaffir lime.

Club of 28

Only a tiny club of 28 chefs hold three stars from the Michelin guide, the bible of French gastronomy.
Last week for the first time the Michelin allowed a top French restaurant to bow out of its listings after its chef told AFP he no longer wanted to work under the “huge pressure” of being judged by its undercover inspectors.
Sebastien Bras’ Le Suquet restaurant in the rural Aveyron region had held the maximum three-star rating for 18 years.
Bras confessed that like “all chefs” he sometimes found himself thinking of fellow Frenchman Bernard Loiseau — who committed suicide in 2003, an act widely seen as linked to rumors that he was about to lose his third Michelin star.
This year the guide is launching a mentoring scheme led by Anne-Sophie Pic, the only woman with three stars in France, to help chefs cope with the pressure that Michelin recognition brings.
“It is a great boost to get a star,” Pic told AFP, “but there is also extra pressure as well as the fear of losing it. It can be a steamroller. With more and more people wanting to book a table at your restaurant, their expectations also rise.”
Canadian Noam Gedalof was among the intake of foreign-born chefs, getting a single star for his restaurant Comice in the French capital, while the Dane Andreas Moller of Copenhagen, Lebanese chef Alan Geaam and the Cypriot Andreas Mavrommatis were also similarly rewarded for their Parisian establishments.
The full Michelin guide for France, whose ratings are based on two or three visits by unannounced inspectors, will be published on Friday.


Foodex Saudi promotes Kingdom’s agriculture

Prince Abdul Aziz bin Nawaf bin Abdul Aziz launches the event. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 14 November 2018
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Foodex Saudi promotes Kingdom’s agriculture

  • The government has been encouraging farmers to produce organic products
  • Organic food products were noticeably present at the exhibition, proving that Saudis are reconsidering their eating habits

JEDDAH: Saudi food exports will become a major non-oil industry over the next five years, according to Prince Abdul Aziz bin Nawaf bin Abdul Aziz, who inaugurated the four-day 6th Foodex Saudi 2018 at the Jeddah Center for Forums and Events on Monday.
During the opening of the largest Saudi international exhibition specializing in the food sector, the prince emphasized the importance of concerted efforts and international partnerships to achieve agricultural development and sustainable food security.
He said the participation of 52 countries represented by 500 international brands reflected the position that Saudi Arabia occupied economically. “It also shows the leading role played by the Kingdom in the Middle East as the largest and most attractive market for all investors,” he said.
The prince said the achievements of food and beverage industries in Saudi Arabia during the first quarter of the current year had reached 82 percent and total funding had increased by 217 percent, according to information issued by the Ministry of Energy, Industry and Mineral Resources. This also revealed that total Saudi exports in the food sector during the past year amounted to SR14 billion for 2017, and the sector ranked fourth in the list of major non-oil exporting industries.
Haya Al-Sunaidi, chairwoman and CEO of Reed Sunaidi Exhibition, organizer of the exhibition, told Arab News that the launch of Foodex Saudi had seen wide participation from international brands, including the latest products in fresh, chilled and frozen foods, dairy products, food services, canned goods, meat, poultry, snacks and sweets.
“This year, we have more exhibitors than those in the last edition or any previous edition of the exhibition. We have both public and private participants,” she said.
“The government has been encouraging farmers to produce organic products. Now we can see that we are producing olive oil, a thing that I had not imagined we could really have,” she said. She added that Saudi Arabia was now exporting dates, poultry and dairy products.
However, Al-Sunaidi said Saudi Arabia was still importing 80 percent of its total food consumption, which is why she believes imported brands will not affect homegrown food production.
Organic food products were noticeably present at the exhibition, proving that Saudis are reconsidering their eating habits. Al-Sunaidi said that Saudi investors and consumers are demanding more organic food products.
Al-Sunaidi said the exhibition, which is seeing European and Asian participation, offers business networking opportunities for industry professionals working in the food and beverage sector. She added that it is also showcasing new food products entering the Saudi market for the first time.
Al-Sunaidi said that leading local, regional and international companies trust the Saudi market. “Saudi Arabia has the largest food market in both the GCC countries and the Middle East. It is also one of the world’s strongest economic and consumer powers,” she said.
“Food and beverage imports are expected to increase up to SR135 billion in 2020 compared to the present rate of SR80 billion. In addition, fast-food market volume exceeds SR5 billion per year and retail sales have surged by 66 percent,” she said.
Meanwhile, general manager of a Kenyan tea company, Naveed Ariff, told Arab News that the Kenyan tea they are promoting at the exhibition is the finest tea in the world. “Unlike any other tea elsewhere, our tea production is always fresh throughout the year, the quality is incomparable and the price is reasonable,” he said.
The Saudi Food and Drug Authority (SFDA) was also present at the exhibition through its booth, which spread its awareness messages to visitors on the latest food security standards aimed at protecting consumers’ health.
The winners of nine awards for food industry innovators will be announced at the exhibition.
Thomas A. Gugler, the president of the World Association of Chefs’ Societies, has announced receiving the nominations for best cold drink, best hot drink, best dairy product, best product in red meat and chicken, best product in the bakery and confectionery sector, best product in the spices and sauces sector, best frozen or cold food product, best organic food product and best healthy food product.
He said the selected candidates were highlighted to visitors, specialists and pioneers of the food industry, and they were assigned a place inside the suite dedicated to the competition at the exhibition.
In contrast, the world’s most famous chefs are competing at the “Salon Culinaire,” held under the auspices of the World Association of Chefs’ Societies and the Saudi Chefs’ Table, during which 200 chefs from the world’s most famous hotels and restaurants compete in 17 categories.