Namariq Residency — a jewel in the heart of KAEC

The launch of the Namariq project took place recently.
Updated 06 February 2018
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Namariq Residency — a jewel in the heart of KAEC

With the launch of its second accommodation complex in Saudi Arabia, Namariq has set the benchmark in the accommodation sector with its quality construction, state-of-the-art facilities and professional workforce.
Housed in the heart of the thriving King Abdullah Economic City, the Namariq project reflects a progressive spirit, which is in line with the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 toward a bright future.
The launch took place on Jan. 31, and was graced with the presence of VIPs, key businessmen and top executives from leading domestic and international companies, along with Ahmad Linjawi, deputy CEO of Emaar, and Abdul Aziz Al-Mohaimeedm, Emaar’s director general, real estate, municipality and urban planning.
The new Namariq Residency complex in KAEC is thoroughly designed and developed to house and serve employees and workers from all sectors with a single-minded vision — to provide better living to its inhabitants so that they are geared-up to deliver their jobs with optimum productivity.
CEO of Namariq, Hussein Hamed Fayez, said: “Namariq is focused and determined to develop a facility that reflects the industry’s best standards coupled with distinctive services.
The core is to have an accommodation facility for workers and employees from various walks of professions and provide them with a quality-led comfortable living. The company is geared-up to extend its hospitality services on large scale with a motive of becoming the most trusted name in the business.”
The vice president of King Abdullah Economic City, Ahmed Linjawi, described Namariq Residency as a true “jewel” in the heart of KAEC. He appreciated the overall concept and execution of the project with a special mention of the fact that quality is what has impressed him, and he believes that it is a very valuable investment that Namariq has made in KAEC.
The Namariq Residency at KAEC has an impressive capacity of accommodating more than 3,084 residents in the first phase. The facilities include a dining hall, housekeeping, laundry services, indoor and outdoor recreation, coffee shop, commercial shops, mosque, and a first aid clinic.


J-PAL boosts refugee education

Updated 20 May 2018
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J-PAL boosts refugee education

The Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is launching a new scheme to help refugees access higher education in development economics. 

The goal of this new collaboration is to empower refugees through training that will enable them to leverage their local knowledge, build their technical skills, and become experts in the fields of development economics and public policy. 

Starting in the summer of 2018, J-PAL is teaming up with MIT’s Refugee Action (ReACT) initiative to provide access for selected refugees to the online MicroMasters program in Data, Economics and Development Policy (DEDP) offered by J-PAL and MIT’s Department of Economics. ReACT, which aims to connect refugees with higher education, will sponsor selected learners and provide access to five online MicroMasters DEDP courses on development economics; in-person workshops on business skills, and paid internships to put their skills into practice. 

Hassan Jameel, president of Community Jameel Saudi Arabia, said: “Education and learning are fundamental to a strong society, and providing access to MIT’s MicroMasters is a foundation upon which to rebuild the disrupted education and careers of refugees worldwide. 

“Building on computer science and entrepreneurship support for refugees in Jordan, this collaborative effort between J-PAL, MIT and ReACT creates another bespoke learning opportunity for refugees, opening doors and knocking down barriers to higher education for learners.” 

A MicroMasters is a professional and academic credential, accredited by MITx, MIT’s online learning platform, and offers individuals a route to applying for a full master’s degree program at MIT or other universities. 

The new initiative uses a carefully crafted model of blended learning — with financial support for online courses and in-person workshops, as well as strong emphasis on community building — to specifically target and overcome the educational challenges facing refugees. This track within ReACT aims to provide refugees with the tools they need to engage as technical experts with the problems facing their communities.