Lana Del Rey ‘super happy’ but jittery after stalker arrested

Singer Lana Del Rey broke down in tears at a concert and acknowledged feeling jitters after police arrested a stalker who allegedly wanted to kidnap her.(AFP)
Updated 07 February 2018
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Lana Del Rey ‘super happy’ but jittery after stalker arrested

NEW YORK: Singer Lana Del Rey broke down in tears at a concert and acknowledged feeling jitters after police arrested a stalker who allegedly wanted to kidnap her.
The 32-year-old artist, known for her melancholic baroque pop and tales of ill-fated love, said she was feeling “a little more emotional than I thought” as she opened a concert Monday night in Atlanta.
“I was feeling totally fine and then I just got a little bit nervous right when I got on stage,” Del Rey said as she wiped her cheeks with her hands and paced the stage, the crowd hollering its support.
“I just want to say that I’m super happy to be with you guys and if I’m a little bit feathery, just bear with me.”
She was referring to an incident shortly before her previous concert Friday in Orlando where police said they arrested 43-year-old Michael Hunt after being tipped off to threatening social media posts.
Hunt was arrested a block away from the concert venue with a knife and a ticket to the concert, police said.
He was being held without bond on charges of attempted kidnapping with a weapon and aggravated stalking with a credible threat, court documents showed. He did not immediately enter a plea.
Hunt’s Facebook page, which remained up Tuesday, showed a round-the-clock obsession with Del Rey interspersed with apocalyptic warnings about the world as well as more obscure bugbears, such as outrage over a group of naked bicyclists.
Hunt, who lives some 135 kilometers (85 miles) away in the western Florida city of Riverview, posted Del Rey’s “I Still Love Him” and appeared to portray himself as the song’s subject.
“I love you so much Lana(.) I can’t wait to be back in your arms in a few days,” he posted, declaring that everyone at the concert “will know who I am when I get there.”


Rare Ottoman dish to go on sale at Sotheby’s London

A rare piece of Iznik pottery is going on sale at Sotheby’s in London on Wednesday. (Shutterstock)
Updated 22 October 2018
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Rare Ottoman dish to go on sale at Sotheby’s London

LONDON: An exceptionally rare, museum-quality piece of Iznik pottery is to go on sale at Sotheby’s in London on Wednesday.

The Debbane Charger (circa 1480) is set to go on sale. Sotheby’s London

The Debbane Charger, or dish (circa 1480), one of the most important pieces of Iznik pottery held in private hands, represents a significant discovery in the field of Ottoman art.
Produced during the reign of Mehmet II, the piece belongs to the earliest group of Iznik, characterized by an intense, inky, blue-black coloring which reflects the embryonic stage of firing control two decades before a brighter cobalt blue was achieved.
The charger is a lost “sibling” to four other large dishes, all of which are held in museums, including the Louvre in Paris. They are described in Nurhan Atasoy and Julian Raby’s book “Iznik: The Pottery of Ottoman Turkey,” where it was suggested they were used in court banquets. Though not identical, they display a number of shared elements — the huge scale, central floret, and use of both Rumi and Hatayi motifs, the names given to the rigorously executed arabesque decoration and Chinoiserie floral scrolls respectively.
The charger was formerly in the collection of bibliophile and businessman Max Debbane, who patronized many leading cultural institutions in the town of his birth, Alexandria in Egypt, as well as serving as president of the Archaeological Society.
Opportunities to acquire works of Iznik pottery from this earliest period are very rare, with the most significant examples dating back to Sotheby’s sales in 1993 and 1997.
Further highlights of the Wednesday’s sale include Indian paintings from the estate of Joe and Helen Darrion and a costume album that presents a comprehensive catalogue of the costumes of Ottoman Turkey in the 19th century.

The sale also includes Indian artworks. Sotheby’s London