Tarantino ‘regrets’ Uma Thurman car-driving scene

Quentin Tarantino and Uma Thurman
Updated 07 February 2018
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Tarantino ‘regrets’ Uma Thurman car-driving scene

LOS ANGELES: Hollywood director Quentin Tarantino said persuading actress Uma Thurman to perform a car-driving scene on the set of “Kill Bill” — which ended with her in the hospital — is the “biggest regret” of his life.
Thurman, 47, in an interview with The New York Times published on Saturday, said she had an enormous fight with Tarantino after the car crashed and accused him of trying to kill her.
She walked back her criticism of Tarantino somewhat in an Instagram post on Monday, saying she does not believe now that he acted with “malicious intent.”
Tarantino delivered his account of the incident which occurred on set in Mexico in an interview published on Monday in Deadline Hollywood.
“None of us ever considered it a stunt,” the 54-year-old director said. “Maybe we should have, but we didn’t.”
He said he drove the strip of road himself to ensure it would be “easy and safe enough for Uma to drive.
“I came in there all happy telling her she could totally do it, it was a straight line, you will have no problem,” he said.
“I told her it would be safe. And it wasn’t. I was wrong,” he said. “I didn’t force her into the car. She got into it because she trusted me.”
Tarantino said it was decided at the last minute because of the light to have Thurman drive the car in the opposite direction.
“And I didn’t think I needed to run the road again to make sure there wasn’t any difference, going in the opposite direction,” he said. “That was one of my most horrendous mistakes, that I didn’t take the time to run the road, one more time.


Canada acquires rare book previously owned by Adolf Hitler

Updated 24 January 2019
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Canada acquires rare book previously owned by Adolf Hitler

  • The book details certain cities' population statistics along with organizations and media outlets key at the time to North America's Jewish communities
  • The bookplate bears an eagle, and swastika, and the words "Ex Libris Adolf Hitler," indicating it was part of his personal library

OTTAWA: Library and Archives Canada announced Wednesday it had acquired a rare 1944 book that once belonged to Adolf Hitler.
Written in German, "Statistics, Media, and Organizations of Jewry in the United States and Canada" is a 137-page report produced in 1944 by Heinz Kloss, a famed German linguist who had contact with US Nazi sympathizers.
The book details certain cities' population statistics along with organizations and media outlets key at the time to North America's Jewish communities, Library and Archives Canada said in a statement.
"This work hints at the story of what might have happened in Canada had the Allies lost World War II. It also demonstrates that the Holocaust was not a purely European event, but rather an operation that was stopped before it reached North America," it added.
The bookplate bears an eagle, and swastika, and the words "Ex Libris Adolf Hitler," indicating it was part of his personal library.
"It is fundamental ... to acquire, preserve and make available documents no matter how controversial or contentious they could be," said Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada.
Hitler was an avid reader with a collection reportedly containing 6,000 to 16,000 titles.
Library and Archives Canada said the book was likely brought back to the US as a souvenir of war, as in spring 1945 American soldiers took thousands of books from the Nazi leader's second home near Berchtesgaden, in the German Alps.
The institution added it acquired the book from a reputable Judaica dealer, who obtained it as part of a collection owned by a Holocaust survivor.