Tarantino ‘regrets’ Uma Thurman car-driving scene

Quentin Tarantino and Uma Thurman
Updated 07 February 2018
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Tarantino ‘regrets’ Uma Thurman car-driving scene

LOS ANGELES: Hollywood director Quentin Tarantino said persuading actress Uma Thurman to perform a car-driving scene on the set of “Kill Bill” — which ended with her in the hospital — is the “biggest regret” of his life.
Thurman, 47, in an interview with The New York Times published on Saturday, said she had an enormous fight with Tarantino after the car crashed and accused him of trying to kill her.
She walked back her criticism of Tarantino somewhat in an Instagram post on Monday, saying she does not believe now that he acted with “malicious intent.”
Tarantino delivered his account of the incident which occurred on set in Mexico in an interview published on Monday in Deadline Hollywood.
“None of us ever considered it a stunt,” the 54-year-old director said. “Maybe we should have, but we didn’t.”
He said he drove the strip of road himself to ensure it would be “easy and safe enough for Uma to drive.
“I came in there all happy telling her she could totally do it, it was a straight line, you will have no problem,” he said.
“I told her it would be safe. And it wasn’t. I was wrong,” he said. “I didn’t force her into the car. She got into it because she trusted me.”
Tarantino said it was decided at the last minute because of the light to have Thurman drive the car in the opposite direction.
“And I didn’t think I needed to run the road again to make sure there wasn’t any difference, going in the opposite direction,” he said. “That was one of my most horrendous mistakes, that I didn’t take the time to run the road, one more time.


‘Sesame Street’ sues over new Melissa McCarthy puppet movie

Updated 26 May 2018
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‘Sesame Street’ sues over new Melissa McCarthy puppet movie

NEW YORK: The makers of “Sesame Street” are suing the promoter of a new Melissa McCarthy movie, saying it’s abusing the famed puppets’ sterling reputation to advertise the R-rated film.
A judge Friday scheduled a hearing next week to consider a request for immediate relief by Sesame Workshop, which sued Thursday in federal court in Manhattan for unspecified damages and an order forcing the film to be marketed differently.
The film, “The Happytime Murders,” is scheduled for release Aug. 17. McCarthy plays a human detective who teams with a puppet partner to investigate grisly puppet murders.
The lawsuit said the “Sesame Street” brand will be harmed by a just-released movie trailer featuring “explicit, profane, drug-using, misogynistic, violent, copulating and even ejaculating puppets” along with the tagline “NO SESAME. ALL STREET.”
STX Productions LLC, in a statement issued in the name of “Fred, Esq,” a lawyer puppet, said it was looking forward to introducing its “adorably unapologetic characters” to adult moviegoers this summer.
“We’re incredibly pleased with the early reaction to the film and how well the trailer has been received by its intended audience,” it said. “While we’re disappointed that Sesame Street does not share in the fun, we are confident in our legal position.”
In court papers, lawyers for Sesame Workshop asked the judge to order STX not to use any of Sesame’s trademarks and intellectual property, including the phrase, “NO SESAME. ALL STREET,” in marketing the film.
They said the marketing materials were confusing viewers into thinking Sesame was involved with or endorsed “this subversion of its own programming — thereby irreparably harming Sesame and its goodwill and brand.”
In a release before the film was made, STX said it would be produced by The Jim Henson Company’s Henson Alternative banner, On The Day Productions, and STXfilms, along with individuals including Brian Henson, Lisa Henson, Melissa McCarthy and Ben Falcone, among others.
In court papers, Sesame’s lawyers said Lisa Henson, chief executive and president of Henson, just days ago emailed Sesame’s chief executive, Jeffrey Dunn, saying it made her “terribly sad” that the marketing campaign “has devolved to this state of affairs.”
Henson said Henson Alternative disagreed with the decision to reference Muppets and Sesame and argued against it, but “contractually we don’t have the right to change it,” according to the court papers.
She also said the Hensons did not view the film as a parody of the Muppets and “resisted creative suggestions. ...Therefore, trading off the famous Muppets to sell the film is exactly what we did not want to have happen,” the court papers said.