36 indicted in global cybercrime ring that stole $530M

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Updated 07 February 2018
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36 indicted in global cybercrime ring that stole $530M

LOS ANGELES: Thirty-six people were indicted in connection with an international identity theft ring known as a “one-stop shop for cybercriminals” that sold stolen credit card information on the dark web, leading to losses of more than $530 million, US prosecutors said Wednesday.
The Infraud Organization — founded in 2010 and operated under the slogan “In Fraud We Trust” — used an online forum to buy and sell stolen credit card and bank account numbers, Social Security numbers and other personal information, the US Justice Department said.
Investigators believe the group’s nearly 11,000 members targeted more than 4.3 million credit cards, debit cards and bank accounts worldwide, Deputy Assistant Attorney General David Rybicki said.
Most of the members of Infraud never met in person and only knew one another through their online usernames, he said. The organization’s goal was to become the premier site to purchase retail items with stolen or counterfeit credit card information, prosecutors said.
The group’s hierarchy included administrators who managed the operation and membership, forum moderators and vendors who sold illicit products and services to members. Members of the group would then use the forum on the dark web — part of the Internet often used for illegal activity — to gather information and facilitate the sale of the stolen data, officials said.
The indictment unsealed Wednesday in Nevada marks the first time the Justice Department has arrested anyone in connection with Infraud, which Rybecki called one of the largest international cybercrime rings.
“This case reflects the alarming and increasing threat posed by cybercrime,” Rybicki said. “The Department of Justice refuses to allow cybercriminals to hide behind the anonymity of the web while stealing personally identifying information, emptying bank accounts, and wreaking havoc on our nation’s digital infrastructure and financial system.”
Thirteen people were taken into custody across the globe, including in California, New York and Alabama. Suspects arrested in France, the United Kingdom, Italy, Australia, Kosovo and Serbia were awaiting extradition.


Flash floods kill at least 13 people in southwest France

Updated 15 October 2018
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Flash floods kill at least 13 people in southwest France

  • People had to be helicoptered to safety from the roofs of their homes as overnight storms dumped

PARIS: Flash floods tore through towns in southwest France, turning waterways into raging torrents that killed at least 13 people, nine of them in just one town, authorities said Monday. People had to be helicoptered to safety from the roofs of their homes as overnight storms dumped the equivalent of several months of rain in just a few hours.
Worst hit was the town of Trebes, east of the medieval walled city of Carcassonne. The rains that swept in from the Mediterranean killed nine people there, Interior Ministry spokesman Frederic de Lanouvelle said.
He told BFMTV that the floods in the Aude region also killed four other people in other locations, left one person missing and seriously injured five others.
In the town of Villegailhenc, witness Ines Siguet said the waters rose so quickly that people were stranded on the roofs of their homes and had to be helicoptered to safety. She posted video of a ripped-up road where a bridge used to be, torn away by a flood torrent that cut the town in half.
“There’s nothing left. There’s just a hole,” the 17-year-old resident told The Associated Press. “It was very violent.”
Other roads also were flooded, leaving the town cut off, she said. Siguet’s school was shut down amid the destruction. Two people were killed in the town, according to the Aude regional government.
Alain Thirion, the prefect of Aude, said some of the dead appeared to have been swept away by floodwaters. In the town of Conques-sur-Orbiel, the river rose by more than six meters (20 feet), he said.
Floodwaters were in some cases too powerful for emergency services to get through, even on boats, he said.
Television images showed waters coursing through towns and villages, with cars stranded in the floods and piled up on top of each other like children’s toys.
The French government rushed hundreds of rescue workers into the flood zone and helicopters buzzed overhead. Schools were closed and authorities were urging people to stay home.