Fashion show spotlights traditional Saudi attire

A model displays a southern headpiece made of jasmines that are worn by brides on their wedding day.
Updated 08 February 2018
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Fashion show spotlights traditional Saudi attire

RIYADH: A fashion show just for women at the King Abdul Aziz Foundation on Monday showcased traditional regional clothing from around the Kingdom.
The National Heritage Society event showed off traditional Saudi clothing in a unique modern form with Saudi models wearing each region’s different attire.
A model strutting down the runway in a red dress embroidered in gold opened the show. She was covered from head to toe, with only her eyes showing. From then on, a rainbow of colors swirled down the runway.
The event, attended by Princess Nouf bint Faisal bin Turki and sponsored by Arabian Centers, took place outdoors, with oud music playing in the background. White chairs and tables lined the spotlit runway. Guests sat amid tall palm trees, and the sound of laughter and chattering filled the air.
Rotana TV covered the event, which was hosted by presenter Roaa Rayan, dressed in a traditional Saudi jalabiya.
Young Saudi women proudly showcased their dresses on the runway. Each model wore a garment from a different region in the Kingdom, representing its heritage.
There were many stands selling clothing. One of the participants was Bin Ghaith Textiles, a prominent Riyadh establishment since the days of King Saud, selling traditional textiles and clothes.
“Sofrat Saud is a well-known textile that has been worn since the days of King Saud; it was brought from India and since then, worn in weddings,” said Al-Jazi Bin Ghaith, the great granddaughter of the founder.
An attendee exclaimed: “Look at how beautiful our clothes were — vibrant colorful and most of all sleek. No woman could possibly look bad in these dresses.”
Layla Al-Bassam, a teacher at the Princess Nourah University, is an advocate of traditional clothing without modern touches. She showcased some of her traditional Saudi designs. She said that today’s show is unique: “We will see the clothing of brides of the Kingdom of all regions.”
Basma Al-Nowaisher, director of activities and events at the National Heritage Society, explained that the event aimed to promote the Kingdom’s traditions and preserve them.


Hajj halls at airport will ease pilgrims’ path, says transport minister

Indian pilgrims arrive at the King Abdulaziz International Airport in Jeddah on August 14, 2018, prior to the start of the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city of Mecakkah. (AFP / Amer Hilabi)
Updated 16 August 2018
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Hajj halls at airport will ease pilgrims’ path, says transport minister

  • Saudi transport minister unveils plan to simplify pilgrims’ travel procedures and provide them with optimum services
  • Streamlining of procedures is expected to reduce pilgrims’ waiting time from three hours last year to about 45 minutes this year

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s transport minister, Nabil bin Mohammed Al-Amoudi, visited the Hajj halls at King Abdulaziz International Airport in Jeddah on Wednesday to ensure that work progress, performance efficiency and the pilgrims’ reception process are in line with the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA) operational plan.

The plan aims to simplify pilgrims’ travel procedures and provide them with optimum services.

During his visit, the minister also checked preparations for receiving Hajj delegations while ensuring the provision of high-standard services. The application of technology systems and electronic programs will also help simplify procedures.

Al-Amoudi praised the Makkah Road initiative, which has been implemented in phases by the Ministry of Hajj and Umrah, in collaboration with other government bodies, to make Hajj procedures easier for pilgrims arriving from Malaysia and Indonesia.

The initiative includes issuing visas, carrying out passport and customs procedures in the two countries, verifying health requirements, sorting luggage and providing bus transport to hotels in Makkah or Madinah.

The initiative also ensures the readiness of GACA by scheduling upcoming flights arriving at the airport, which simplifies entry procedures.

Streamlining of procedures is expected to reduce pilgrims’ waiting time from three hours last year to about 45 minutes this year. Al-Amoudi said that the improvements are the result of the directives and support provided by the Saudi government to all air, sea and land ports.

“The Saudi government is keen to make every effort to simplify procedures for pilgrims and enable them to perform the Hajj and Umrah rites easily and safely through the cooperation and integration of all government and private sectors,” he said.

Pilgrims receive the utmost care from the time they arrive in Saudi Arabia until they return to their home countries, he added.

The minister thanked staff working in Hajj halls for their work and praised the integration of efforts between government bodies, especially employees of the Ministry of Interior and Ministry of Health.

He also commended the readiness of GACA’s team, highlighting their excellence in providing transport services based on the guidance of the Saudi leadership for serving pilgrims.