Sports training program launched in Riyadh to inspire youth leadership

School children take part in physical fitness activities at the Al-Tarbiya Al-Namothajiyah School in Riyadh. (Courtesy: trbyh)photo via Twitter)
Updated 08 February 2018
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Sports training program launched in Riyadh to inspire youth leadership

JEDDAH: A new training program to build knowledge of sports teaching and inspire leaders in community sport across the Kingdom has been launched by the British Council and the Ministry of Education.

Opened in a special ceremony at Al-Tarbiyah Al-Namout Hajjiyah Boys’ School in Riyadh, Youth Sports Leadership (YSL) training identifies and works with local coaches and trainers to engage young leaders aged 14-19 in the organization of accessible sports events and programs in their local communities.

Held in partnership with Youth Sports Trust International, an independent charity, YSL will run over the next two weeks in Riyadh, with additional training taking place at schools in Jeddah and the Eastern Province later this month.

Speaking at the ceremony, Mohammed Al-Moqbel, executive director of the National Center for Professional Education Development at the Ministry of Education, said: “It’s really important to the nation’s Vision 2030 goals and to working to ensure that young people, students and teachers in every corner of the country have access to quality sports education that inspires and motivates them to lead healthy and active lifestyles.”

Speaking on the training and the British Council’s wider sports initiatives in the Gulf, Amir Ramzan, country director for Saudi Arabia at the council, said: “The benefit that young people get from being involved in sports in any capacity is so valuable, from learning about teamwork and inclusion to organization and commitment.

“We’ve already seen that even participating in sport just once can help crucial skills like problem-solving and communication. We look forward to seeing the impact with Youth Sports Leadership now and in the next three years.”

YSL will run until Feb. 14 at Al-Tarbiyah Al-Namout Hajjiyah Boys’ School and Al-Abnaa Girls’ School in Riyadh. It will be rolled out in Jeddah and the Eastern Province on Feb. 19-25.


GCC, global parliamentary groups warn Iran of consequences

GCC Secretary-General Abdullateef Al-Zayani
Updated 21 min 16 sec ago
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GCC, global parliamentary groups warn Iran of consequences

  • Maintaining security and stability in the region is the first priority of the Gulf states
  • Iran is in non-compliance with paragraph 14 of UNSC resolution 2216, as a UN panel has already identified missile remnants

RIYADH: A number of parliamentarians from different countries including the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) have warned Iran of grave consequences if it continues to indulge in proxy wars with neighboring Arab countries that threaten the peace and stability in the Middle East.

In statements issued on the 37th anniversary of the GCC’s establishment, parliamentarian criticized Iranian role in the Yemen conflict and Tehran’s continued support to the Houthi militias that have so far fired more than 100 ballistic missiles on Saudi Arabia.
“Maintaining security and stability in the region is the first priority of the Gulf states,” said GCC Secretary-General Abdullateef Al-Zayani.
Al-Zayani appreciated “the pivotal role of the Saudi leadership in backing the GCC General Secretariat to achieve the collective goals and implement the resolutions of the Supreme Council.”
He called on Iran “to refrain from meddling in the affairs of Arab nations, and stop supplying arms and ammunition to its Houthi militants to save Yemen from the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.”
The “All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Yemen” in the British Parliament last Wednesday released its annual report on the situation in the war-stricken country, warning, for the first time, of “Iran’s hand in the civil war and its attempt to project power on the Arabian peninsula.”
The APPG observed that “cooperation with non-state actors is an integral part of Iran’s foreign policy through which it seeks to consolidate power across the region.” As examples of this strategy, the group named Iran’s support for the Lebanon-based terrorist organization Hezbollah, as well as Iranian militias in Syria and Iraq.
It further noted that “Iran’s stance against the war must be judged in the context of its desire to undermine the Western and Saudi influence in Yemen.”
The British group has warned that Tehran’s arming of the Houthi rebels has led to a “major escalation” in the conflict.
Commenting on these reports, Mohammed Al-Khunaizi, a Saudi Shoura Council member, said that “Iran has had complicity in most of the regional conflicts, and the involvement of Tehran has been hampering all efforts to restore peace and security in the Middle East.”
He said: “Iran is in non-compliance with paragraph 14 of UNSC resolution 2216, as a UN panel has already identified missile remnants, related military equipment that are of Iranian origin and were/are being used in Yemen.”
“The growing involvement of Iran in the affairs of the Arab nations has led many of its Arab neighbors to distance itself from Tehran,” said Dr. Ibrahim Al-Qayid, the founding member of the National Society of Human Rights (NSHR).
In fact, the Arab League has recently supported Morocco’s decision to sever ties with Iran over its support for the Polisario Front, he said.