UAE’s Crescent Petroleum says it will more than double Iraq gas output in 3 years

Crescent Petroleum plans to raise natural gas output at its Pearl Petroleum venture in northern Iraq by 80 million cubic feet per day by October. (Courtesy Crescent Petroleum)
Updated 08 February 2018
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UAE’s Crescent Petroleum says it will more than double Iraq gas output in 3 years

ABU DHABI: UAE-based energy firm Crescent Petroleum plans to raise natural gas output at its Pearl Petroleum venture in northern Iraq by 80 million cubic feet per day by October, and by 500 million cfd within three years, the company’s president said on Thursday.
Badr Jafar, speaking at a business conference, said Crescent was also keen to engage in the oil and gas sector in the south of Iraq. Pearl currently produces 330 million cfd of gas and 20,000 barrels per day of condensate in northern Iraq, he said.
Pearl is owned 35 percent by Crescent Petroleum, 35 percent by Crescent’s affiliate Dana Gas, 10 percent by Austria’s OMV, 10 percent by Germany’s RWE, and 10 percent by Hungary’s MOL.
Jafar also said that Gulftainer, a privately owned port management and logistics company based in the UAE, which he chairs, aimed to close an acquisition on the US East Coast this year.
If the acquisition closes successfully, Gulftainer will invest an additional $350 million over 10 years in the US, over and above the company’s plans at Canaveral Container Terminal, he said. Gulftainer currently operates eight terminals worldwide including one in the US.


Deutsche Bank to cut over 7,000 jobs

Updated 24 May 2018
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Deutsche Bank to cut over 7,000 jobs

FRANKFURT: Deutsche Bank said on Thursday it will reduce global staff levels to well below 90,000 from the current 97,000, as part of a broad restructuring to reduce costs and restore profitability.

The bank said it would cut headcount by 25 percent in its equities sales and trading business following a review of the business.

The reductions will decrease the investment bank’s leverage exposure by €100 billion ($117 billion), or 10 percent, with most of the cuts to take place this year, Deutsche said.

“We remain committed to our Corporate & Investment Bank and our international presence – we are unwavering in that,” Chief Executive Officer Christian Sewing said in a statement.

“We are Europe’s alternative in the international financing and capital markets business. However, we must concentrate on what we truly do well.”

The details on the bank’s strategy come ahead of the bank’s annual general meeting on Thursday.

Shareholders, fed up with a languishing share price and dwindling revenues, said they would call on the bank’s management to speed up the recovery process at the AGM.

The loss-making bank said after an abrupt management reshuffle last month that it aimed to scale back its global investment bank and refocus on Europe and its home market after three consecutive years of losses. It had flagged cuts to US bond trading, equities, and the business that serves hedge funds.

Thursday’s shareholder meeting comes after months of turmoil for the lender, Germany’s largest.

Deutsche Bank Chairman Paul Achleitner last month abruptly replaced CEO John Cryan with Sewing amid investor complaints that the bank was falling behind in executing a turnaround plan.

Deutsche’s shares are down more than 31 percent so far this year.

The bank is also under pressure from credit ratings agencies. Standard & Poor’s is expected to say by the end of the month whether it will cut Deutsche Bank’s rating after putting it on “credit watch” in April.