Investcorp to fit out some of its part-owned Saudi gyms for women

Investcorp acquired a 25 percent stake in 2013 in Leejam Sports, which operates fitness clubs in Saudi Arabia under the Fitness Time brand. (Courtesy Leejam Sports)
Updated 08 February 2018
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Investcorp to fit out some of its part-owned Saudi gyms for women

ABU DHABI: Bahrain-based private equity firm Investcorp is turning some of the gyms it part owns in Saudi Arabia into women-only facilities in response to surging demand, its co-chief executive said on Thursday.
The move comes as the deeply conservative kingdom embarks on a transformation that encompasses giving women more freedoms, including being allowed to drive and attend sporting events.
“Recently the regulations were relaxed to allow women gyms. There’s tremendous demand, so we are re-purposing some of our existing gyms that used to be male-only to female-only,” Rishi Kapoor told reporters on the sidelines of a business event.
Investcorp acquired a 25 percent stake in 2013 in Leejam Sports, which operates fitness clubs in Saudi Arabia under the Fitness Time brand. Around 40 of the roughly 115 existing gyms will be refitted this year to become women-only, Investcorp said.
Kapoor said Leejam was a “likely candidate” for Investcorp to consider exiting its investment, but didn’t elaborate.
Investcorp has previously considered an initial public offering (IPO) for the company, but on Thursday declined to comment on any potential IPO.
Investcorp is looking at acquisition opportunities in Saudi Arabia arising from a push to privatize the economy, with a focus on health care, including long-term care, post-acute rehabilitation and preventative care, Kapoor said.
The company is in advanced stages of merger and acquisition deals in the Gulf, the US and Europe, he said.
Each of the deals would be within the company’s targeted enterprise value — equity plus debt — of $200 million to $500 million, he added.
Investcorp, founded in 1982, is one of the oldest Middle Eastern private equity houses and is best known outside the region for listing luxury goods brands such as Gucci and Tiffany & Co.
But the company is increasingly branching out into other sectors, with Kapoor highlighting infrastructure and credit as among those where it is scouting for acquisitions.
The company aims to raise its assets under management to $50 billion in five to seven years from $22.4 billion at the end of December.
In future, more of those assets are likely to come from Asia, where the company is placing greater focus since opening an office in Singapore last year.
Currently, around 35 percent of its assets are in the Gulf, with a similar proportion in the US and smaller one in Europe, Kapoor said.
Asia’s contribution will rise from less than 10 percent now to around 25 percent over five to seven years, he said.


SoftBank mobile unit to go for $21bn IPO

Updated 13 November 2018
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SoftBank mobile unit to go for $21bn IPO

  • The IPO will be one of the biggest ever worldwide, and will provide the group with funds to pay down debt and continue placing big bets on innovations
  • SoftBank’s bets so far have been as varied as small gaming startups, ride-hailing firms such as Uber Technologies, and e-commerce behemoth Alibaba Group Holding

TOKYO: SoftBank Group Corp. has won approval to conduct a 2.4 trillion yen ($21.04 billion) initial public offering (IPO) of its domestic telecoms business, in a deal that will seal the group’s transformation into a top global technology investor.
The IPO will be one of the biggest ever worldwide, and will provide the group with funds to pay down debt and continue placing big bets on innovations that CEO Masayoshi Son predicts will drive future tech trends.
SoftBank’s bets so far have been as varied as small gaming startups, ride-hailing firms such as Uber Technologies, and e-commerce behemoth Alibaba Group Holding.
SoftBank Group aims to raise 2.4 trillion yen through the sale of 1.6 billion SoftBank Corp. shares at an tentative price of 1,500 yen each, a filing with the Ministry of Finance showed on Monday.

 

 The amount could rise by 240.6 billion yen if demand triggers an overallotment, taking the total closer to the $25 billion that Alibaba raised in 2014 in the biggest-ever IPO.
The final IPO price will be determined on Dec. 10, and SoftBank Corp. will list on the Tokyo Stock Exchange on Dec. 19 with an initial market value of 7.18 trillion yen — about 1 trillion yen above that of rival KDDI Corp, which has about 10 million more subscribers.
The parent will retain a stake of around two-thirds, depending on the overallotment.
The mammoth offering comes at a time when investors have begun questioning the outlook for Japan’s telecoms companies.
The IPO was initially expected to appeal to investors seeking stability, but the government has recently called on carriers to lower fees while backing more wireless competition, sending shockwaves through the industry.
Yet SoftBank’s brand is still likely to draw retail investors long accustomed to using SoftBank’s phone and Internet services. Many still see CEO Son as a tech visionary who brought Apple’s iPhone to Japan.
Japanese households are commonly seen as an attractive target in IPOs with their 1,829 trillion yen in financial assets, even if they are traditionally risk-averse with over 50 percent of assets in cash and deposits. More than 80 percent of the shares will be offered to domestic retail investors, a person with knowledge of the matter told Reuters.
“I think a reasonable amount of money will be attracted to this one,” said Tetsutaro Abe, an equity research analyst at Aizawa Securities. “It’s a mobile company, so the cash flow is steady.”

FACTOID

SoftBank to sell 1.6 billion shares at a tentative price of 1,500 yen ($13) each.