Ick-factor: London fatberg goes from sewer to museum

In this photograph, the only remaining piece of the 130 ton, 250 meter long fatberg, removed from the sewers in east London, is displayed during a media preview at the Museum of London.(AP)
Updated 08 February 2018
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Ick-factor: London fatberg goes from sewer to museum

LONDON: London’s newest museum attraction is greasy, smelly — and a glimpse at the hidden underside of urban life.
The Museum of London is displaying part of a 130 metric-ton (143 US-ton) fatberg that was blasted out of a city sewer last year.
It took sewage workers weeks to dislodge the 250-meter-long (820-foot-long) mass of oil, fat, diapers and baby wipes from beneath the city’s East End.
The museum has preserved an air-dried chunk, about the size of a shoebox, whose mottled consistency a curator likens to parmesan crossed with moon rock.
Curator Vyki Sparkes said Thursday that the fatberg is “disgusting and fascinating. And that’s what’s been great to work with. It has this impact on people.”
The fatberg is on display from Friday until July 1. Admission is free.


Archaeologists discover Greco-Roman era building in Egypt

Updated 23 May 2018
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Archaeologists discover Greco-Roman era building in Egypt

  • A gold coin depicting King Ptolemy III, who ruled Egypt in the 3rd century B.C. and was an ancestor of the famed Cleopatra, was one of the significant finds.
  • Antiquities Ministry says archaeologists have unearthed other artifacts in the area, including pottery vessels, terracotta statues, bronze tools and a small statue of a ram.

CAIRO: Egyptian archaeologists say they have discovered parts of a huge red brick building dating back to the Greco-Roman period north of Cairo.
The Antiquities Ministry says Wednesday the building was found in the Sa El-Hagar archaeological site in Gharbia province.
It says archaeologists found a gold coin depicting King Ptolemy III, who ruled Egypt in the 3rd century B.C. and was an ancestor of the famed Cleopatra. It says the coin was made during the reign of King Ptolemy IV in memory of his father.
The ministry says archaeologists have unearthed other artifacts in the area, including pottery vessels, terracotta statues, bronze tools and a small statue of a ram.
Egypt hopes such discoveries will spur tourism, which has suffered from political turmoil following the 2011 uprising.