Istanbul airport gains transit passenger share from Gulf

Flight bookings for passengers changing planes in Istanbul in the first quarter of 2018 are currently up 21 percent compared with the same time last year. (Reuters)
Updated 08 February 2018
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Istanbul airport gains transit passenger share from Gulf

BERLIN: Major airports in the Gulf are losing out to Istanbul on lucrative transfer traffic this year as Turkey recovers from security worries, according to data from travel data analysis company Forward Keys.
Turkey is enjoying a recovery in tourism demand, with tour operator Thomas Cook on Thursday calling it the standout destination for this summer.
“In addition to the success of various routes, Istanbul’s growth has been helped by a reduction in terrorist incidents in Turkey,” Forward Keys CEO Olivier Jager said.
Flight bookings for passengers changing planes in Istanbul in the first quarter of 2018 are currently up 21 percent compared with the same time last year, Forward Keys said.
Transfer bookings for Dubai are down 0.5 percent, while for Abu Dhabi they are 14 percent lower. Doha, which has been hit by an embargo from four other Arab nations, managed to keep transfer traffic flat, according to Forward Keys, which analyzes more than 17 million flight booking transactions a day.
Passengers in transit can bring extra revenue for airports because they often spend their time shopping or eating.


EU could compensate firms hit by US sanctions over Iran — French minister

Updated 20 May 2018
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EU could compensate firms hit by US sanctions over Iran — French minister

  • In 1996, when the United States tried to penalize foreign companies trading with Cuba, the EU forced Washington to back down by threatening retaliatory sanctions

PARIS: France is looking to see if the European Union could compensate European companies that might be facing sanctions by the United States for doing business with Iran, said French finance minister Bruno Le Maire on Sunday.
Le Maire referred to EU rules going back to 1996 which he said could allow the EU to intervene in this manner to protect European companies against any US sanctions, adding that France wanted the EU to toughen its stance in this area.
In 1996, when the United States tried to penalize foreign companies trading with Cuba, the EU forced Washington to back down by threatening retaliatory sanctions.
European firms doing business in Iran face sanctions from the United States after President Donald Trump withdrew from a 2015 nuclear deal with Iran.
“Are we going to allow the United States to be the economic policeman of the world? The answer is no,” Le Maire told C News TV and Europe 1 radio on Sunday.
Le Maire added it was important Italy kept its EU budget commitments, in light of plans by Italy’s new coalition government to ramp up spending — which could put Rome at odds with the EU.