Nissan slashes profit forecasts after inspection scandal

This Nov. 10, 2017 photo shows a gallery of the Nissan Motor Co. at its global headquarters in Yokohama. (AP)
Updated 08 February 2018
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Nissan slashes profit forecasts after inspection scandal

TOKYO: Japanese car giant Nissan on Thursday slashed its forecast for full-year operating profit after admitting that a damaging inspection scandal last year had “adversely impacted” the firm’s performance.
Nissan said it now expects operating profit of 565 billion yen ($5.2 billion) for the fiscal year to March 2018, a drop of 12.4 percent from its previous estimate in November.
“During the period, the Group’s performance was adversely impacted by special items related to the final vehicle inspection issue in Japan, along with slowing sales growth, negative pricing trends and inventory adjustments in the US market,” it said in a statement.
Nissan was forced to recall some 1.2 million vehicles after admitting in October that staff without proper authorization had conducted final inspections on some vehicles intended for the domestic market before they were shipped to dealers.
The automaker suspended all domestic production for a few weeks, sending its passenger car sales plummeting more than 55 percent in Japan in October.
In a bid to atone for the scandal, chief executive officer Hiroto Saikawa said he was “voluntarily” returning his pay, along with other executives.
Vice president Joji Tagawa told reporters that it had been a “challenging” period for the carmaker but saw some light at the end of the tunnel.
“We remain focused on improving the state of our business performance and our financial results despite market headwinds ... we expect to normalize our operations by the end of the fiscal year,” he said.
“We take it very seriously so we are putting in place various measures to cope with the situation.”
Nissan’s operating profit for the nine months to December 2017 were 364.2 billion yen, a 27.6 percent decline from the same period last year.
Nissan sold a total of 4.1 million vehicles — a gain of 2.9 percent on-year — but again the inspection scandal took its toll.
There was a 3.4-percent dip in car sales in Japan because of the inspection issue, Nissan said.


Oil edges up on Saudi output cut and Iran sanctions

Updated 14 August 2018
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Oil edges up on Saudi output cut and Iran sanctions

  • The cut comes amid expected export declines from Iran once the US re-imposes sanctions on Tehran
  • The OPEC report said it expected world oil demand to grow by 1.43 million bpd in 2019, down from 1.64 million bpd in 2018

SINGAPORE: Oil prices inched up on Tuesday after a report from OPEC confirmed that top exporter Saudi Arabia had cut production to avert looming oversupply, although concerns over a slowdown in economic growth kept a lid on markets.
Front-month Brent crude oil futures were at $72.85 per barrel at 0658 GMT, up 25 cents, or 0.3 percent, from their last close.
US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were up 25 cents, or 0.4 percent, at $67.45 per barrel.
In July, Saudi Arabia told the producer group of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) that it had curbed production by 200,000 barrels per day (bpd) to 10.288 million bpd.
The cut comes amid expected export declines from Iran once the US re-imposes sanctions on Tehran’s petroleum industry from November.
OPEC’s monthly report published on Monday, which uses data from secondary sources, confirmed the Saudi cut, which traders said triggered crude’s upward move early on Tuesday.
That came despite the Saudi move coming in anticipation of a slowdown in oil demand.
The OPEC report said it expected world oil demand to grow by 1.43 million bpd in 2019, down from 1.64 million bpd in 2018.
OPEC said the demand slowdown would come on the back of potentially lower economic growth as a result of trade disputes between the United States and China as well as emerging market turmoil.
China’s economy is showing further signs of cooling as the US prepares to impose even tougher trade tariffs, with investment in the first seven months of the year slowing to a record low and retail sales softening, data showed on Tuesday.
“Data from China failed to meet market expectations, which could be another signal that the world economy is slowing down,” said Sukrit Vijayakar.