Najran governor launches first phase of Saudi project to restore wildlife in reserve

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Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)
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Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)
Updated 08 February 2018
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Najran governor launches first phase of Saudi project to restore wildlife in reserve

NAJRAN: Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz has launched a project on Thursday to restore wildlife in the Uruq Bani Ma’arid Reserve.
He said during the launch: “We live among the efforts to preserve and develop wildlife, both animal and plant life; we look at the grace and security that God had granted us, so we are sparing no effort to protect the animals and plants in a disturbed region, where some of its areas are witnessing the most cruel images of abuse of man and humanity, and a violation of religion, soul, mind, honor and money.”
Prince Jalawi stressed the importance of the achievements of the Saudi Wildlife Commission, which attempts to overcome all obstacles to confront imminent dangers and restore the ecological balance.
He released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago.
The vice president of the commission, Dr. Hani Tatwani, said that the commission aims to enhance its role in developing and executing plans to confront the dangers facing wildlife, both in the sea and on land. It also endeavors to rehabilitate the near-extinct species and those which are endangered.
There will be restoration of wildlife in five different reserves in Harra Al-Harra, Khanafah, Al Tabiq, Taysiyya, and Awal.
At the end of the launch, the Saudi Wildlife Commission staged three presentations about the King Khaled Wildlife Research Center in Thamamah.
Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)
 
Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)


Shada Mountain: A top attraction in Baha region

Updated 9 min 51 sec ago
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Shada Mountain: A top attraction in Baha region

JEDDAH: The Shada Mountain in Baha region is one of the most beautiful tourist attractions in the Kingdom, and perhaps in the Middle East, due to its unique geological formation.
The mountain includes caves and grottoes engraved with drawings and inscriptions dating back to more than 3,000 years.
Due to weather conditions in the region, the local rocks offer unique scenery, as many of them resemble the forms of different animals.
Saudi Arabia and its leadership are keen to promote Saudi heritage sites as part of Vision 2030.
This month, Prince Sultan bin Salman, president of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), ordered the continuation of archaeological excavations at Jarash.
Excavation work will continue with the participation of students from King Khalid University, said Mohammed Al-Umrah, director of the SCTH in the Asir region.






Excavation teams at Jarash have discovered relics as old as 3,000 years.
Jarash, near Abha, is among the most important archaeological sites in Asir province. The site is one of the most important in the history of the Arabian Peninsula.
Recently, SCTH announced the registration of more than 53,000 historical artifacts and relics that it successfully managed to restore from inside and outside the Kingdom.
In 2011, Prince Sultan launched a campaign for retrieving national artifacts, including media and cultural programs and initiatives that aim to enlighten and inform citizens about the value of artifacts and the importance of returning them to the SCTH.